• Based on Andrew Feinstein’s book The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade, the feature documentary Shadow World is about the only business that counts its profits in billions and its losses in human lives.

  • In 1992, teenager Sandi Tan shot Singapore’s first road movie with her enigmatic American mentor, Georges—who then absconded with all the footage. The 16mm film is recovered 20 years later, sending Tan, now a novelist in Los Angeles, on a personal odyssey in search of Georges’ vanishing footprints—and her own.

  • Strong Island examines the violent death of the filmmaker’s brother 25 years ago, and the judicial system that allowed his killer to go free. The film calls us to bear witness to the reality rather than the abstraction of injustice, going beyond interviews into the homes of those left behind, into profound crises of civic faith.  Strong Island interrogates murderous fear, racialized perception, and re-imagines the wreckage in catastrophe’s wake, challenging us to change.

  • Filmed in the high grasslands of eastern Tibet, Summer Pasture is an intimate glimpse into the life of a young nomad couple and their infant daughter. Locho and his wife Yama live in Dzachukha, nicknamed Wu-Zui (5-Most) for being the highest, coldest, poorest, largest, and most remote county in China’s Sichuan Province. They depend on their herd of yaks for survival, much as their ancestors have for generations. But in recent years, Dzachukha has undergone rapid development, and Locho and Yama are finding their traditional way of life increasingly difficult more

  • In sync with the innovative instincts demonstrated in their first feature 45365, Bill and Turner Ross’ Tchoupitoulas takes the term documentary to mean, primarily, the documenting of an experience — a distinct time and a place and the people that inhabit it. No interviews, no voiceover; just the evocation of an existence and the feelings it conjures. Three young brothers take a secret sunset journey across a river to a pleasure island that’s always been forbidden to them. As such, the Fiction conceit of Tchoupitoulas is as timeless as a more

  • Before the ‘Teenager’ was invented, there was no second stage of life. You were either a child or you went to work as an adult. At the turn of the century, child labor was ending, ‘adolescence’ was emerging, and a struggle erupted between adults and youth. Would the young be controlled and regimented, or could they be free? Inspired by punk author Jon Savage’s book, Teenage gives voice to young people from the first half of the 20th century in America, England, and Germany — from party-crazed Flappers and hip more

  • Filmed over the course of 23 years, The Betrayal: Nerakhoon is an epic story of one family’s journey from war-torn Laos to the mean streets of New York in the 80’s to the present. Thavisouk Phrasavath tells the story of himself as a young man struggling to survive a war and the hardships of immigrant life. His mother tells her own astonishing tale of perseverance as a soldier’s wife.

  • The film tracks the irrepressible and lovable Mir as he journeys into early adulthood from a naïve 8-year-old to a fully grown adult in one of the toughest place on earth — Afghanistan.

  • The Cage Fighter is the story of a man in the fight of his life. Joe Carman (40) is a blue-collar Washington State boilermaker and master plumber, a loving father and husband. Unable to cope with stresses at home, reeling from his wife’s recent illness and an ongoing custody battle, Joe escapes back into the fighting cage — the one place he’d promised never to set foot again. By trading his inner pain for physical blows, Joe struggles to heal himself and come to terms with his past. In the fighting more

  • Marsha P. Johnson, the legendary “drag queen,” Stonewall veteran, and co-founder of the trans-rights movement, was found dead in the Hudson River 24 years ago, and her best friend and fellow activist Sylvia Rivera died a few years later, the victim of a broken heart. Now, as decades-old interviews and never-before-seen video footage have surfaced, contemporary trans activists dig through the clues in search of justice for Marsha and Sylvia, and along the way they discover a deeper connection to the movement’s first leaders.

  • Blending the personal, poetic and political, filmmaker Petra Costa charts the unfolding political landscape of Brazil to explore one of the most dramatic periods in her country’s history. With unprecedented access to Presidents Dilma Rousseff and Lula da Silva, Petra explores the rise and fall of both leaders and the tragically polarized nation that remains. The film not only captures this crucial moment in history but serves as a cautionary tale for these times of democratic crisis.

  • A mercurial young artist steps through the looking glass on a quest to reconcile trans-generational trauma within her family lineage. Blending bold animation with archival footage and intimate family interviews, the director invites us on an intrepid journey into the nature of the self and history’s grip on the present.

  • The Force presents a cinema vérité look deep inside the long-troubled Oakland Police Department as it struggles to confront federal demands for reform, a popular uprising following events in Ferguson, MO, and an explosive scandal.

  • On April 20, 2010, communities throughout the Gulf Coast of the United States were devastated by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon, a state-of-the-art, offshore oil-drilling rig operated by BP in the Gulf of Mexico. The blast killed 11 of the rig’s 126 crewmembers and injured many more, setting off a fireball that could be seen 35 miles away. After two days ablaze, the Deepwater Horizon sank, causing the largest offshore oil spill in American history. The spill flowed unabated for almost three months, dumping hundreds of millions of gallons more

  • At a popular bakery café, residents of New York’s Upper East Side get bagels and coffee served with a smile 24 hours a day. But behind the scenes, undocumented immigrant workers face sub-legal wages, dangerous machinery, and abusive managers who will fire them for calling in sick. Mild-mannered sandwich maker Mahoma López has never been interested in politics, but in January 2012, he convinces a small group of his co-workers to fight back. Risking deportation and the loss of their livelihood, the workers team up with a diverse crew of more

  • A film about climate change, disguised as a portrait of collective anxiety.

  • In 2010, the media branded a platoon of U.S. Army infantry soldiers “The Kill Team” following reports of its killing for sport in Afghanistan. Now, one of the accused must fight the government he defended on the battlefield, while grappling with his own role in the alleged murders. Dan Krauss’s absorbing documentary examines the stories of four men implicated in heinous war crimes in a stark reminder that, in war, innocence may be relative to the insanity around you.

  • Two spirited daughters from China’s last remaining matriarchal society are thrust into the worldwide economic downturn when they lose the only jobs they’ve ever known. Left with few options, Jua Ma and La Tsuo leave Beijing for home, a remote village in the foothills of the Himalayas. But home is no longer what it was, as growing exposure to the modern world irreparably changes the provocative traditions the Mosuo have built around their belief that marriage is an attack on the family. Determined to keep their mother and siblings out more

  • From director Sam Green: “In 2014 I made a film about the Guinness Book of World Records called The Measure of All Things. The film featured all sorts of records: the person with the longest name, the tallest man, the biggest cat, the longest period of time a person has gone without sleep. But one record struck me above all the others: the oldest person in the world. Whenever someone dies, they take with them all of the knowledge and experiences in their memory. The last Titanic survivor died in more

  • An unfiltered look at the physical and emotional realities facing our aging population, The Patron Saints is an atmospheric and at times surrealistic exploration of assisted living. Bound by first hand accounts of a nursing home’s youngest resident (a recently disabled 50 year-old named James), the film weaves together startling images, scenes, portraits and stories from the residents and those who care for them. Eschewing conventional documentary methods for a heightened visual approach to its storytelling, fundamental questions are raised about the process of aging, the challenge of coping with more