• Cutie and the Boxer chronicles the marriage of two Japanese artists, Ushio and Noriko Shinohara, who met in New York City in the late 1960’s and have been living and working there since. As a young artist in Tokyo, Ushio became famous for his raucous performance art and action painting. He set out for New York City in 1969 seeking international recognition, and after four decades of hard work, he has achieved notoriety but little commercial success. His wife Noriko, 21 years his junior, moved to New York at age more

  • God Loves Uganda explores the role of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting dangerous religious bigotry. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and missionaries as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to fundamentalist Christianity. As an American influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the more

  • Inside Out — The People’s Art Project tracks the evolution of the biggest participatory art project in the world, the wildly popular Inside Out. Travel the globe with French artist JR as he motivates entire communities to define their most important causes with incredibly passionate displays of giant black and white portraits pasted in the street. We witness young and old taking ownership of walls that were previously restricted, and in doing so testing the limits of what they thought was possible. In capturing the process, Alastair Siddons creates a glowing more

  • To a growing number of Mexicans and Latinos in the Americas, narco-traffickers have become iconic outlaws, glorified by musicians who praise their new models of fame and success. They represent a pathway out of the ghetto, nurturing a new American dream fueled by an addiction to money, drugs, and violence. Narco Cultura offers an explosive look at the drug cartels’ pop culture influence on both sides of the border as experienced by an LA narcocorrido singer dreaming of stardom and a Juarez crime scene investigator on the front line of more

  • Throughout Richard Nixon’s presidency, three of his top White House aides ­obsessively documented their experiences with Super 8 home movie cameras. Young, idealistic and dedicated, they had no idea that a few years later they’d all be in prison. This unique and personal visual record, created by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin, was seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation, then filed away and forgotten for almost 40 years. Our Nixon is an all-archival documentary presenting those home movies for the first time, along with other rare more

  • A 28-year-old electrician living in Kanpur is renowned for his prowess in stealing electricity. He is a robin-hood figure, stealing electricity and charging the rich to provide free connections in impoverished neighborhoods. In the face of day-long power-cuts, he runs illegal connections from one neighborhood to another so that homes, factories and businesses could function normally. On the other hand, the city administration is renewing efforts to clamp down on power-theft, which costs them millions of rupees in losses each year. Yearly drives to remove illegal connections are met with more

  • During the U.S. debate about healthcare reform, the media — reporters and news crews and filmmakers — failed to put a human face on what it means to not have access to healthcare. Remote Area Medical fills that gap — it is a film about people, not policy. Focusing on a single three-day clinic held in the Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee, Remote Area Medical affords us an insider’s perspective on the ebb and flow of the event — from the tense 3:30 a.m. ticket distribution that determines who gets more

  • Before the ‘Teenager’ was invented, there was no second stage of life. You were either a child or you went to work as an adult. At the turn of the century, child labor was ending, ‘adolescence’ was emerging, and a struggle erupted between adults and youth. Would the young be controlled and regimented, or could they be free? Inspired by punk author Jon Savage’s book, Teenage gives voice to young people from the first half of the 20th century in America, England, and Germany — from party-crazed Flappers and hip more

  • In 2010, the media branded a platoon of U.S. Army infantry soldiers “The Kill Team” following reports of its killing for sport in Afghanistan. Now, one of the accused must fight the government he defended on the battlefield, while grappling with his own role in the alleged murders. Dan Krauss’s absorbing documentary examines the stories of four men implicated in heinous war crimes in a stark reminder that, in war, innocence may be relative to the insanity around you.

  • In Karachi, Pak­istan, a run­away boy’s life hangs on one crit­i­cal ques­tion: where is home? The streets, an orphan­age, or with the fam­ily he fled in the first place? Simul­ta­ne­ously heart-wrenching and life-affirming, These Birds Walk doc­u­ments the strug­gles of these way­ward street chil­dren and the samar­i­tans look­ing out for them in this ethe­real and inspi­ra­tional story of resilience.

  • Ai Weiwei is China’s most famous international artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. First-time director Alison Klayman gained more

  • Detroit is an iconic city. Go anywhere in the world, say “Detroit,” and it strikes a set of images — Motown, Hockeytown, Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, 8 Mile … Also crime, foreclosures, poverty, white flight, race … and fire. But these are mere snapshots, glimpses into a deeper, more complex panorama. No one understands this better than the people literally putting out the fires, battling every day in an uncertain war. BURN is a character-driven documentary about Detroit, told through the eyes of Detroiters who are on the front lines more

  • In an unmarked office at the end of a dirt track, Uganda’s first openly gay man, David Kato, labors to repeal his country’s homophobic laws and liberate his fellow LGBT men and women, or “kuchus.” But this formidable task becomes even more difficult when the Anti-Homosexuality Bill is introduced, proposing death for gay men and prison for anyone who fails to turn in a rumored homosexual. Inspired by American evangelicals who have christened Uganda ground zero in their war on the “homosexual agenda,” the bill awaits a vote in Uganda’s more

  • In Montana, a climactic vote is underway. The Capitol’s halls are packed with concerned citizens crying a litany of passionate appeals. Lawmakers press “yay” or “nay” buttons. The vote concludes: “House Bill 161 has passed.” The House of Representatives has voted to end medical marijuana in the state of Montana. Will the Senate and the Governor follow the course of the House of Representatives? A showdown is set. Activists statewide rally support among citizens already polarized on the issue. Chronically ill patients and growers clash with educators, parents, and clergy. more

  • Delta Boys explores the untold stories of the Niger Delta and the Niger Delta militancy. This intimate look at the militias, their goals, and their global impact, follows the lives of two militants: Ateke Tom, the “Godfather” of the Niger Delta Vigilante Force, and Chima, a 21-year-old who escaped prison with Ateke’s help. The film also documents life in a tiny fishing village where Mama, a 22-year-old, struggles to give birth to her first child with the help of a traditional midwife and no access to modern medical care, while more

  • Informant examines Brandon Darby, a radical activist turned FBI informant who has been both vilified and deified, but never entirely understood. In 2005, Darby became an overnight activist hero when he traveled to Katrina-devastated New Orleans and braved toxic floodwaters to rescue a friend stranded in the Ninth Ward. Soon after, he became a founding member of Common Ground, a successful grassroots relief organization. After two young activists were arrested at the 2008 Republican National Convention, Darby shocked close friends and activists nationwide by revealing he had been instrumental in more

  • Imagine if Grey Gardens’ Little Edie had actually realized her dream of moving into a studio apartment on 10th Avenue: her life might have resembled that of Laura’s, a Brazilian expat in New York City who lives two contradictory lives. (Synopsis by The Hamptons Film Festival)

  • Young-Chan comes from the Planet of Snail. Dwellers of this tiny planet are deaf and blind and call themselves “snails” because they rely only on their tactile senses and communicating by touch. Young-Chan was not happy with the lethargic life on the planet. When Young-Chan came to Earth, there was nothing Earth offered him. Worse was that nobody understood his language. When he was desperate, an angel walked into his life. Soon-Ho is a woman who knows what loneliness is about and where Young-Chan’s deeply rooted pain comes from. She more

  • There are ebbs and flows to the news cycle, but what is the deeper story of a place? That is the question tugging at a veteran reporter and photojournalist on the Mexican border. He tackles the same stories that filled his reporter’s notebook early in his career: immigration, corruption and narco-related violence. Today, he works in an environment where the stakes are vastly higher. Mexico is the most dangerous country in Latin America for the media. More than 30 journalists or media workers have been murdered or have vanished since more

  • In sync with the innovative instincts demonstrated in their first feature 45365, Bill and Turner Ross’ Tchoupitoulas takes the term documentary to mean, primarily, the documenting of an experience — a distinct time and a place and the people that inhabit it. No interviews, no voiceover; just the evocation of an existence and the feelings it conjures. Three young brothers take a secret sunset journey across a river to a pleasure island that’s always been forbidden to them. As such, the Fiction conceit of Tchoupitoulas is as timeless as a more