• Filmed with vérité intimacy for over a decade, Quest is a portrait of a family in North Philadelphia. Christopher “Quest” Rainey, along with his wife Christine’a, aka “Ma Quest,” open the door to their home music studio, which serves as a creative sanctuary from the strife that grips their neighborhood. Over the years, the family evolves as everyday life brings a mix of joy and unexpected crisis. Set against the backdrop of a country now in turmoil, Quest is a tender depiction of an American family whose journey is a more

  • Strong Island examines the violent death of the filmmaker’s brother 25 years ago, and the judicial system that allowed his killer to go free. The film calls us to bear witness to the reality rather than the abstraction of injustice, going beyond interviews into the homes of those left behind, into profound crises of civic faith.  Strong Island interrogates murderous fear, racialized perception, and re-imagines the wreckage in catastrophe’s wake, challenging us to change.

  • The Cage Fighter is the story of a man in the fight of his life. Joe Carman (40) is a blue-collar Washington State boilermaker and master plumber, a loving father and husband. Unable to cope with stresses at home, reeling from his wife’s recent illness and an ongoing custody battle, Joe escapes back into the fighting cage — the one place he’d promised never to set foot again. By trading his inner pain for physical blows, Joe struggles to heal himself and come to terms with his past. In the fighting more

  • Marsha P. Johnson, the legendary “drag queen,” Stonewall veteran, and co-founder of the trans-rights movement, was found dead in the Hudson River 24 years ago, and her best friend and fellow activist Sylvia Rivera died a few years later, the victim of a broken heart. Now, as decades-old interviews and never-before-seen video footage have surfaced, contemporary trans activists dig through the clues in search of justice for Marsha and Sylvia, and along the way they discover a deeper connection to the movement’s first leaders.

  • The Force presents a cinema vérité look deep inside the long-troubled Oakland Police Department as it struggles to confront federal demands for reform, a popular uprising following events in Ferguson, MO, and an explosive scandal.

  • Told solely through archival footage, and set against the backdrop of the Cold War, The Reagan Show captures the pageantry, absurdity, and charisma of a prolific actor’s defining role: Leader of the Free World.

  • Why is it that some countries seem to be continually mired in cyclical wars, political instability and economic crises? The Democratic Republic of the Congo is one such a place, a mineral-rich Central African country that, over the last two decades, has seen more than five million conflict-related deaths, multiple regime changes and the wholesale impoverishment of its people. Yet though this ongoing conflict is the world’s bloodiest since WWII, little is known in the West about the players or stakes involved. This is Congo provides an immersive and unfiltered more

  • The activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice bring you Whose Streets — a documentary about the Ferguson uprising. When Michael Brown is killed and left lying in the street for hours it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis. Grief, long-standing tension, and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil in protest of this latest tragedy. In the days that follow, artists, musicians, teachers and parents turn into freedom fighters, standing on the front lines to demand justice. As the national guard more

  • Do Not Resist explores the militarization of local police departments — in their tactics, training, and acquisition of equipment — since 9/11. With unprecedented access to police conventions, equipment expos, and officers themselves, filmmaker Craig Atkinson, the son of a SWAT team member, has crafted an eye-popping nonpartisan look at the changing face of law enforcement in America.

  • In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing an unavoidable endeavor he was about to embark on: the writing of his last book, Remember This House. The book would be an account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his friends — Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers and Malcolm X. Their murders permanently traumatized an entire generation. James Baldwin was never able to go beyond 30 pages before he died. The manuscript, Notes toward Remember This House, was entrusted to Raoul Peck by the more

  • In 1983, after decades of steady deterioration, writer and academic John Hull became totally blind. To help him make sense of the upheaval in his life, he began keeping a diary on audio-cassette. Over three years he recorded in excess of sixteen hours of material — a unique testimony of loss, rebirth and renewal, which excavates the interior world of blindness. Notes on Blindness is based on the same source material as the 12-minute Emmy Award-winning New York Times Op-Doc, which premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival before going on more

  • Based on Andrew Feinstein’s book The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade, the feature documentary Shadow World is about the only business that counts its profits in billions and its losses in human lives.

  • More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt further away or more out of sight. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a non-fiction film about the prison in which we never see an actual penitentiary. A medidation on the prison’s disappearance in the era of mass incarceration, the film unfolds a cinematic journey through a series of ordinary places across the USA where prisons do work and affect lives: from a more

  • With unprecedented access, What Tomorrow Brings goes inside the very first girls’ school in one small Afghan village. Never before have fathers here allowed their daughters to be educated, and they aren’t sure they even want to now. From the school’s beginnings in 2009 to its first graduation in 2015, the film traces the interconnected stories of students, teachers, village elders, parents, and school founder Razia Jan. While the girls learn to read and write, their education goes far beyond the classroom to become lessons about tradition and time. They discover more

  • In this tense and immersive tour de force, audiences are taken directly into the line of fire between powerful, opposing Peruvian leaders who will stop at nothing to keep their respective goals intact. On the one side is President Alan Garcia, who, eager to enter the world stage, begins aggressively extracting oil, minerals, and gas from untouched indigenous Amazonian land. He is quickly met with fierce opposition from indigenous leader Alberto Pizango, whose impassioned speeches against Garcia’s destructive actions prove a powerful rallying cry to throngs of his supporters. When Garcia more

  • Spanning the period from the outbreak of the Egyptian revolution in 2011 until the ouster or ex-President Morsi three years later, Whose Country? is a first-person account of one Cairo-based filmmaker’s interactions with a group of plainclothes policemen — the kind of security personnel who had become notorious in Egypt for widespread corruption and abuses of civilians — main causes for the January 25 uprising. Through verité footage and in one-on-one interviews, the policemen reveal the ways in which the security forces abused their role in society. At the same time, the filmmaker grapples with issues of more

  • In the summer of 1968, ABC News hired two great intellectuals to meet for televised debates during the presidential conventions. William F. Buckley was a leading light of the nascent neo-conservative movement — he’d founded the National Review in 1955. Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist and a Democrat by heritage, a cousin to Jackie Onasis. Vidal and Buckley each thought the other’s political ideologies were dangerous, even catastrophic for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they slugged out policy, personal insult, and revisionist histories staking out more

  • Kimberley defends Western and Afghan clients accused of criminal actions in the Afghan legal system. At first, she came to Afghanistan for the money, but then it became about something else. Kimberley — who had never before left the US — saw how poorly the legal system in Afghanistan was run and how this part of Afghan society had been totally neglected by the international community. For over five years now, human rights cases and troubled expats have motivated her to stay, but personal threats, and the general condition in the country, more

  • All around the world, at any given moment, random people post personal video clips online. They are their virtual messages in a bottle, tossed into the boundless sea that is the Internet. Most of these posts flounder in a sad limbo of indifference and anonymity — unless your YouTube handle happens to be Princess Shaw. Samantha Montgomery, 38, lives on her own in one of New Orleans’ toughest neighborhoods. By day she works as a caregiver for the elderly; at night she transforms into Princess Shaw, belting out soulful originals more

  • The world’s largest salt flat, Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni, is a pristine, otherworldly expanse of white. For generations, the only signs of life have been the “saleros” who harvest salt from its radiant surface. This remote region is thrust into the future when Bolivia’s leaders embark on a plan to extract a precious mineral found beneath the salt crust, and to build an infrastructure connecting the Salar to the outside world. Salero, a nonfiction feature film, is a poetic journey through the eyes of Moises, one of the last remaining more