• In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. FEC that corporations have the same constitutional rights as citizens and are entitled to make unlimited political contributions, political cash is flowing faster and with less transparency than ever before. Citizen Koch tells the story of this landmark decision and follows extraordinary citizen leaders who, in the face of economic hard times and extreme political polarization, are mobilizing to defend their democratic values. From Wisconsin to Wall Street, from the left and the right. Citizen Koch helps more

  • In January 2013, filmmaker Laura Poitras was in the process of constructing a film about abuses of national security in post-9/11 America when she started receiving encrypted e-mails from someone identifying himself as “citizen four,” who was ready to blow the whistle on the massive covert surveillance programs run by the NSA and other intelligence agencies. In June 2013, she and reporter Glenn Greenwald flew to Hong Kong for the first of many meetings with the man who turned out to be Edward Snowden. She brought her camera with her. more

  • In Montana, a climactic vote is underway. The Capitol’s halls are packed with concerned citizens crying a litany of passionate appeals. Lawmakers press “yay” or “nay” buttons. The vote concludes: “House Bill 161 has passed.” The House of Representatives has voted to end medical marijuana in the state of Montana. Will the Senate and the Governor follow the course of the House of Representatives? A showdown is set. Activists statewide rally support among citizens already polarized on the issue. Chronically ill patients and growers clash with educators, parents, and clergy. more

  • Cutie and the Boxer chronicles the marriage of two Japanese artists, Ushio and Noriko Shinohara, who met in New York City in the late 1960’s and have been living and working there since. As a young artist in Tokyo, Ushio became famous for his raucous performance art and action painting. He set out for New York City in 1969 seeking international recognition, and after four decades of hard work, he has achieved notoriety but little commercial success. His wife Noriko, 21 years his junior, moved to New York at age more

  • Death by hyperthermia is the official designation. A parent forgets a child in a car, misremembering having dropped them off and leaves the child for so many hours that the child dies of heatstroke. These unpleasant stories sometimes reach the news. Often with the same reactions of hatred toward the parent. Janette Fennel, founder of kidsandcars.org, explains this tendency: “People want them to be monsters. They feel that by saying these things and dissociating anything about themselves and these parents, that could protect them.” Happening on average every ninth day more

  • Delta Boys explores the untold stories of the Niger Delta and the Niger Delta militancy. This intimate look at the militias, their goals, and their global impact, follows the lives of two militants: Ateke Tom, the “Godfather” of the Niger Delta Vigilante Force, and Chima, a 21-year-old who escaped prison with Ateke’s help. The film also documents life in a tiny fishing village where Mama, a 22-year-old, struggles to give birth to her first child with the help of a traditional midwife and no access to modern medical care, while more

  • Dina, an outspoken and eccentric 49-year-old in suburban Philadelphia, invites her fiancé Scott, a Walmart door greeter, to move in with her. Having grown up neurologically diverse in a world blind to the value of their experience, the two are head-over-heels for one another, but shacking up poses a new challenge. Whether at the local nail salon, the warm beaches of Ocean City, Dina’s racy bachelorette party, or on honeymoon in the Poconos, Dina captures the cadences and candid conversations of a relationship that reexamines the notion of love on-screen.

  • Do Not Resist explores the militarization of local police departments — in their tactics, training, and acquisition of equipment — since 9/11. With unprecedented access to police conventions, equipment expos, and officers themselves, filmmaker Craig Atkinson, the son of a SWAT team member, has crafted an eye-popping nonpartisan look at the changing face of law enforcement in America.

  • A twenty-first century tale of identity and genetic inheritance, and perhaps the family of the future. For the first time in history a generation of children born through artificial insemination are old enough to search for their biological fathers. For some, it will prove to be a fruitless journey, but the offspring of Donor Unknown have a dad who is willing and ready to be found.

  • Set against Californias decaying suburban communities in the aftermath of Americas economic collapse, Dragonslayer is a documentary portrait of Skreech, a homeless, 21st century, punk-rock Holden Caulfield trying to find a future for himself with only a backpack, sleeping bag, 20 pairs of sunglasses and skateboard to his name. Living out of a tent, Skreech spends his days breaking into the backyards of foreclosed homes and draining the scum water from their abandoned swimming pools so he can do the one thing that makes him want to keep on living: more

  • E-Team is driven by the high-stakes investigative work of Anna Neistat, Fred Abrahams and Peter Bouckaert, three members of Human Rights Watch’s Emergency Team. Peter, a savvy strategist who lives with his family in Geneva, has been called “the James Bond of human-rights investigators” by Rolling Stone magazine. Fred is a tireless New York City native whose early investigations led him to face Slobodan Milosevic in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Anna draws upon her childhood experiences in the former USSR to feed her righteous indignation about more

  • Elephant’s Dream tells the story of a group of public sector workers who live in the third largest city in Africa, Kinshasa, DR Congo, where the weight of history has not stopped them from pursuing hopes and dreams. This film takes us beyond the usual reports of the Congo, to provide poetic and compassionate insight into a country in transition, as seen through the microcosm of three state-owned institutions, a rail-station, the central post-office and the only existing fire station in Kinshasa, a city of 10 million inhabitants. At times more

  • Darius Clark Monroe turns the camera on himself in order to present a more accurate image of one African American man against the backdrop of this country’s ongoing criminalization of his peers. Now a graduate of NYU Film School, Monroe Clark crafts an intricate and emotionally complex narrative of his own trajectory from straight-A student to bank robber, while ultimately reflecting on the racial and economic factors that surround his crime as he searches for answers and seeks forgiveness. One afternoon in the mid-1990s, a 16-year old Darius donned a more

  • Twenty years ago Garnet Frost escaped London and headed into the desolate Scottish wilderness. Setting off without a map, disaster struck. Lost, cold and alone — trapped between a mountain and the mysterious Loch Arkaig — he resigned himself to die. But Garnet didn’t die. By sheer chance, he was saved by a lone fisherman. For the past two decades, Garnet has been haunted by a memento from his doomed trip. He believes an unusual wooden staff he found while waiting to die is actually a marker for one of history’s more

  • The largest domestic natural gas drilling boom in history has swept across the United States. The Halliburton-developed drilling technology of “fracking” or hydraulic fracturing, has unlocked a “Saudia Arabia of natural gas” just beneath us. But is fracking safe? When filmmaker Josh Fox is asked to lease his land for drilling, he embarks on a cross-country odyssey uncovering a trail of secrets, lies and contamination. A recently drilled nearby Pennsylvania town reports that residents are able to light their drinking water on fire. This is just one of the many more

  • Lauren Greenfield’s postcard from the edge of the American Empire captures a portrait of a materialistic, image-obsessed culture. Simultaneously photographic journey, memoir, and historical essay, the film bears witness to the global boom–bust economy, the corrupted American Dream and the human costs of late-stage capitalism, narcissism and greed.

  • Girl Model follows U.S. and Russian model scouts who travel through remote Siberian villages looking for thirteen to fifteen-year-old girls suitable for modeling jobs in Japan. This poetic film brings viewers into a modeling industry rife with mirrors, images, facades, and uncertainty. It is difficult to know who these young girls can trust and where the industry takes them when their eyes are covered.

  • God Loves Uganda explores the role of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting dangerous religious bigotry. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and missionaries as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to fundamentalist Christianity. As an American influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the more

  • Through intimate vérité, archival footage, and visually innovative treatments of her poetry, Going to Mars: The Nikki Giovanni Project pushes the boundaries of biographical documentary film to reveal the enduring influence of one of America’s greatest living artists and social commentators.

  • A look at the intersection of religion and activism, tracing the rise of The Satanic Temple: only six years old and already one of the most controversial religious movements in American history. The Temple is calling for a Satanic revolution to save the nation’s soul. But are they for real?