• Nowhere is the worldwide erosion of democracy, fueled by social media disinformation campaigns, more starkly evident than in the authoritarian regime of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. Journalist Maria Ressa places the tools of the free press—and her freedom—on the line in defense of truth and democracy.

  • A radical perspective that shifts focus from the idea of separateness to oneness. This film was recorded over several intense months during the Summer of 2019 in Harlem NY, Brussels and Haarlem, Netherlands. A film of formlessness out of the norm. The first film from this director this long. A more spiritual cinematic vision. And a continuation of tradition of polyphonic portraiture with something like a full album for a score.

  • In this war story told in a unique key, portraits of Syrian families displaced and fractured by war create a meditation on parental love that is both urgent and timeless. The film is an artful and urgent call to focus on our shared humanity, counter demonizing rhetoric, and ensure our governments and communities keep welcoming those fleeing war.

  • When a family becomes concerned about their mother’s wellbeing in a retirement home, private investigator Romulo hires Sergio, an 83 year-old man who becomes a new resident–and a mole inside the home, who struggles to balance his assignment with becoming increasingly involved in the lives of several residents.

  • A look at the intersection of religion and activism, tracing the rise of The Satanic Temple: only six years old and already one of the most controversial religious movements in American history. The Temple is calling for a Satanic revolution to save the nation’s soul. But are they for real?

  • Jawline follows 16-year-old Austyn Tester, a rising star in the live-broadcast ecosystem who built his following on wide-eyed optimism and teen girl lust, as he tries to escape a dead-end life in rural Tennessee.

  • In Mexico City, the government operates fewer than 45 emergency ambulances for a population of 9 million. This has spawned an underground industry of for-profit ambulances often run by people with little or no training or certification. An exception in this ethically fraught, cutthroat industry, the Ochoa family struggles to keep their financial needs from jeopardizing the people in their care. When a crackdown by corrupt police pushes the family into greater hardship, they face increasing moral dilemmas even as they continue providing essential emergency medical services.

  • When the Taliban puts a bounty on Afghan director Hassan Fazili’s head, he is forced to flee with his wife and two young daughters. Capturing their uncertain journey, Fazili shows firsthand the dangers facing refugees seeking asylum and the love shared between a family on the run.

  • Active Scientologists and other practitioners of new religions are investigated in a mesmerizing exploration of belief.

  • Blending the personal, poetic and political, filmmaker Petra Costa charts the unfolding political landscape of Brazil to explore one of the most dramatic periods in her country’s history. With unprecedented access to Presidents Dilma Rousseff and Lula da Silva, Petra explores the rise and fall of both leaders and the tragically polarized nation that remains. The film not only captures this crucial moment in history but serves as a cautionary tale for these times of democratic crisis.

  • A film about climate change, disguised as a portrait of collective anxiety.

  • In the shadow of the largest Native American occupation since Wounded Knee, thousands of Water Protectors descend upon the Standing Rock Reservation to resist construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Told through a Native lens and with unprecedented access, Akicita captures the spirit of a movement and its people.

  • Part film, part baptism, in Black Mother director Khalik Allah brings us on a spiritual journey through Jamaica. Soaking up its bustling metropolises and tranquil countryside, Allah introduces us to a succession of vividly rendered souls who call this island home. Their candid testimonies create a polyphonic symphony, set against a visual prayer of indelible portraiture. Thoroughly immersed between the sacred and profane, Black Mother channels rebellion and reverence into a deeply personal ode informed by Jamaica’s turbulent history but existing in the urgent present.

  • Lauren Greenfield’s postcard from the edge of the American Empire captures a portrait of a materialistic, image-obsessed culture. Simultaneously photographic journey, memoir, and historical essay, the film bears witness to the global boom–bust economy, the corrupted American Dream and the human costs of late-stage capitalism, narcissism and greed.

  • Composed of intimate and unencumbered moments of people in a community, this film allows the viewer an emotive impression of the Historic South—trumpeting the beauty of life and consequences of the social construction of race.

  • MATANGI / MAYA / M.I.A. is drawn from a cache of personal tapes shot by Maya Arulpragasm and her closest friends over the last 22 years, capturing her remarkable journey from immigrant teenager in London, to the international popstar M.I.A. Inspired by her roots, M.I.A. created a mashup, cut-and-paste identity that pulled from every corner of her journey; a sonic sketchbook that blended Tamil politics, Art school punk, hip-hop beats and the voice of multicultural youth. Never compromising, Maya kept her camera rolling through her battles with the music industry more

  • Part time capsule, part folk song, Phantom Cowboys follows three teenage boys as they approach adulthood in vastly different parts of the United States. Moving fluidly between the deserts of California, the valleys of West Virginia, and the sugarcane fields of Florida, the film explores the lives of these young men during two formative periods—transitioning forward and backward in time over a span of eight years. Larry, Nick, and Ty navigate their teenage and early-adult years through a series of interconnected vignettes, candidly narrated in their own words. The film’s more

  • In 1992, teenager Sandi Tan shot Singapore’s first road movie with her enigmatic American mentor, Georges—who then absconded with all the footage. The 16mm film is recovered 20 years later, sending Tan, now a novelist in Los Angeles, on a personal odyssey in search of Georges’ vanishing footprints—and her own.

  • Between Azerbaijan and Armenia, men young and old labor to build a new railroad promising to bring glory to a new generation.  Meanwhile, across closed borders, a lonely stationmaster sits idle in suspended time, waiting for twenty five years for the return of trains.  Across the closed borders of Eurasia, men reflect upon their desires and regrets, floating through the expanse striving to fill their days and dreams, as much as their pockets.

  • Amal is a feisty teenager growing up in post-revolution Egypt while they’re both undergoing a tremendous change. Within a constant political turmoil, Amal searches for her place, identity, and sexuality in a patriarchal society. Amal, whose name literally translates to “hope”, is embarking on a 6-year compelling journey from childhood to adulthood. Along the way, she realizes her limited options as a woman living in an Arab police state.