• Bluebird explores the interconnectedness of a small town in the northern reaches of Maine. When Lesley, the local school bus driver, becomes distracted during her end-of-day inspection, she fails to notice a sleeping boy in the back of the bus. What happens next shatters the tranquility of her small logging town, proving that even the slightest actions have enormous consequences. Stricken by an overwhelming sense of guilt, Lesley’s fragility is further tested by her husband — a local logger preoccupied by the imminent closing of the town paper mill — more

  • In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. FEC that corporations have the same constitutional rights as citizens and are entitled to make unlimited political contributions, political cash is flowing faster and with less transparency than ever before. Citizen Koch tells the story of this landmark decision and follows extraordinary citizen leaders who, in the face of economic hard times and extreme political polarization, are mobilizing to defend their democratic values. From Wisconsin to Wall Street, from the left and the right. Citizen Koch helps more

  • After suffering an injury, Abby’s life changes forever. She needs more than what her life is offering — she needs to become Eleanor.

  • Cutie and the Boxer chronicles the marriage of two Japanese artists, Ushio and Noriko Shinohara, who met in New York City in the late 1960’s and have been living and working there since. As a young artist in Tokyo, Ushio became famous for his raucous performance art and action painting. He set out for New York City in 1969 seeking international recognition, and after four decades of hard work, he has achieved notoriety but little commercial success. His wife Noriko, 21 years his junior, moved to New York at age more

  • The true story of Oscar, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who wakes up on the morning of December 31, 2008 and feels something in the air. Not sure what it is, he takes it as a sign to get a head start on his resolutions: being a better son to his mother, whose birthday falls on New Year’s Eve, being a better partner to his girlfriend, who he hasn’t been completely honest with as of late, and being a better father to T, their beautiful 4-year-old daughter. He starts out more

  • God Loves Uganda explores the role of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting dangerous religious bigotry. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and missionaries as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to fundamentalist Christianity. As an American influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the more

  • Inside Out — The People’s Art Project tracks the evolution of the biggest participatory art project in the world, the wildly popular Inside Out. Travel the globe with French artist JR as he motivates entire communities to define their most important causes with incredibly passionate displays of giant black and white portraits pasted in the street. We witness young and old taking ownership of walls that were previously restricted, and in doing so testing the limits of what they thought was possible. In capturing the process, Alastair Siddons creates a glowing more

  • Lila, a fourteen-year-old spends a hot summer in a blue-collar Brooklyn neighborhood far removed from the bustling city. Awkward, lonely, and often playing the third wheel, Lila is determined to emulate the sexual exploits of her more experienced best friend. She fixates on Sammy, a tough older guy, when she hears that “he’ll sleep with anyone.” Deluded in her romantic pursuit, Lila tries desperately to insert herself into Sammy’s gritty world, but in doing so she puts herself into a dangerously vulnerable situation.

  • Set against a vivid New York City backdrop, in the heart of Brooklyn, we are taken into the lives of both Lebo Mobama, owner and chef of a small African restaurant which he runs with his mother, Ma Lebo and his brother, Piet; and his fiancee, Mosa Matashane, who has waited six years to start a new life with Lebo in the States. Eager to uphold their African culture, Lebo and Mosa have a traditional Basotho wedding, filled with dance and music, culminating in a sensual ceremony where Mosa is named more

  • To a growing number of Mexicans and Latinos in the Americas, narco-traffickers have become iconic outlaws, glorified by musicians who praise their new models of fame and success. They represent a pathway out of the ghetto, nurturing a new American dream fueled by an addiction to money, drugs, and violence. Narco Cultura offers an explosive look at the drug cartels’ pop culture influence on both sides of the border as experienced by an LA narcocorrido singer dreaming of stardom and a Juarez crime scene investigator on the front line of more

  • Throughout Richard Nixon’s presidency, three of his top White House aides ­obsessively documented their experiences with Super 8 home movie cameras. Young, idealistic and dedicated, they had no idea that a few years later they’d all be in prison. This unique and personal visual record, created by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin, was seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation, then filed away and forgotten for almost 40 years. Our Nixon is an all-archival documentary presenting those home movies for the first time, along with other rare more

  • During the U.S. debate about healthcare reform, the media — reporters and news crews and filmmakers — failed to put a human face on what it means to not have access to healthcare. Remote Area Medical fills that gap — it is a film about people, not policy. Focusing on a single three-day clinic held in the Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee, Remote Area Medical affords us an insider’s perspective on the ebb and flow of the event — from the tense 3:30 a.m. ticket distribution that determines who gets more

  • Melissa Winters works as a cashier in a convenience store. It’s a dead end job, one dollar above minimum wage, but it’s as good as she can get. Her boyfriend, Richie Barnes (Matt Dillon) is permanently disabled from a motorcycle accident he had years ago. A former television repair man, Richie now lives month to month on a government disability check. He would love to get a real job, but instead, he drinks. Sunlight Jr. is a social issue film disguised as a love story. Melissa and Richie live together more

  • Before the ‘Teenager’ was invented, there was no second stage of life. You were either a child or you went to work as an adult. At the turn of the century, child labor was ending, ‘adolescence’ was emerging, and a struggle erupted between adults and youth. Would the young be controlled and regimented, or could they be free? Inspired by punk author Jon Savage’s book, Teenage gives voice to young people from the first half of the 20th century in America, England, and Germany — from party-crazed Flappers and hip more

  • When his fiercely self-reliant mother dies unexpectedly, eleven year-old Atticus is wary of the authorities and flees deep into the forests of his Catskills home. His sheltered, off-the-grid childhood is over, and a new life on the move has begun. As Atticus wanders the woods in a daze, relying on whatever food and shelter he can find, the line between reality and fantasy begins to blur. When he encounters Carter, a scruffy, pot smoking drifter who lives out of his car and sells necklaces at music festivals, Atticus latches on. more

  • In 2010, the media branded a platoon of U.S. Army infantry soldiers “The Kill Team” following reports of its killing for sport in Afghanistan. Now, one of the accused must fight the government he defended on the battlefield, while grappling with his own role in the alleged murders. Dan Krauss’s absorbing documentary examines the stories of four men implicated in heinous war crimes in a stark reminder that, in war, innocence may be relative to the insanity around you.

  • In Karachi, Pak­istan, a run­away boy’s life hangs on one crit­i­cal ques­tion: where is home? The streets, an orphan­age, or with the fam­ily he fled in the first place? Simul­ta­ne­ously heart-wrenching and life-affirming, These Birds Walk doc­u­ments the strug­gles of these way­ward street chil­dren and the samar­i­tans look­ing out for them in this ethe­real and inspi­ra­tional story of resilience.

  • Two men each search in their quiet solitude to begin a new life amidst an unspoken need for encouragement and support. Martin Bonner has just moved to Reno from the East Coast, leaving behind his two adult children and a life he spent more than two decades building. Having recently declared bankruptcy, he’s working a new job as a volunteer coordinator helping prisoners transition to freedom. It’s Martin’s first job in two years. Travis Holloway, a recently released prisoner in the program, sent back into the world with nothing, also more

  • Wolf is a lonely, silent, sixteen-year-old boy. He tries to hide his emotions, but sometimes he is overwhelmed by the smell of a girl’s hair, or when trying to peek under Clara’s short skirt — the 20-year-old who visits her boyfriend who lives upstairs. Wolf lives with his younger brother and his mother. He doesn’t have a father, he just has a few things of his that remind Wolf of his father’s death, and Wolf tries to avoid them. The burden of watching over his family has fallen to him, but more

  • Ai Weiwei is China’s most famous international artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. First-time director Alison Klayman gained more