• Watchers of the Sky interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin — the man who created the word “genocide,” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, Watchers of the Sky takes you on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action.

  • Andrew Neiman is an ambitious young jazz drummer, in pursuit of rising to the top of his elite music conservatory. Terence Fletcher, an instructor known for his terrifying teaching methods, discovers Andrew and transfers the aspiring drummer into the top jazz ensemble, forever changing the young man’s life. But Andrew’s passion to achieve perfection quickly spirals into obsession, as his ruthless teacher pushes him to the brink of his ability and his sanity.

  • Filmmaker Talya Lavie steps into the spotlight with a dark comedy about everyday life for a unit of young, female Israeli soldiers. The human resources office at a remote desert base serves as the setting for this cast of characters, who bide their time pushing paper, battling for the top score in Minesweeper, and counting down the minutes until they can return to civilian life. Amidst their boredom and clashing personalities, issues of commitment — from friendship to love and country — are handled with humor and sharp-edged wit.

  • Part psychological thriller and part provocative character study, A Teacher explores the unraveling of a young high school teacher, Diana (Lindsay Burdge), after she begins an affair with one of her teenage students, Eric (Will Brittain). What starts as a seemingly innocent fling becomes increasingly complex and dangerous as the beautiful and confident Diana gets fully consumed by her emotions, crossing boundaries and acting out in progressively startling ways. Lindsay Burdge delivers a deeply compelling and seamlessly naturalistic performance that brings us into the mind of an adult driven to taboo more

  • The subjects of Before You Know It are no ordinary senior citizens. They are go-go booted bar-hoppers, love struck activists, troublemaking baton twirlers, late night Internet cruisers, seasoned renegades and bold adventurers. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans over the age of 55 in the United States, many of whom face heightened levels of discrimination, neglect and exclusion. But Before is not a film about cold statistics and gloomy realities, it’s a film about generational trailblazers who have surmounted prejudice and defied expectation more

  • Blue Caprice starring Isaiah Washington, Tequan Richmond, Joey Lauren Adams and Tim Blake Nelson is the striking feature film debut of writer-director Alexandre Moors and co-writer, R.F.I. Porto. Blue Caprice is a harrowing yet restrained psychological thriller about an abandoned boy lured to America into the shadows of a dangerous father figure. Marked by captivating performances by Isaiah Washington and Tequan Richmond, lyrical camerawork, and a unique and bold structure, Blue Caprice documents the mechanisms that lead its subjects to embrace physical violence. Blue Caprice paints a riveting portrait of more

  • Bluebird explores the interconnectedness of a small town in the northern reaches of Maine. When Lesley, the local school bus driver, becomes distracted during her end-of-day inspection, she fails to notice a sleeping boy in the back of the bus. What happens next shatters the tranquility of her small logging town, proving that even the slightest actions have enormous consequences. Stricken by an overwhelming sense of guilt, Lesley’s fragility is further tested by her husband — a local logger preoccupied by the imminent closing of the town paper mill — more

  • In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. FEC that corporations have the same constitutional rights as citizens and are entitled to make unlimited political contributions, political cash is flowing faster and with less transparency than ever before. Citizen Koch tells the story of this landmark decision and follows extraordinary citizen leaders who, in the face of economic hard times and extreme political polarization, are mobilizing to defend their democratic values. From Wisconsin to Wall Street, from the left and the right. Citizen Koch helps more

  • After suffering an injury, Abby’s life changes forever. She needs more than what her life is offering — she needs to become Eleanor.

  • Cutie and the Boxer chronicles the marriage of two Japanese artists, Ushio and Noriko Shinohara, who met in New York City in the late 1960’s and have been living and working there since. As a young artist in Tokyo, Ushio became famous for his raucous performance art and action painting. He set out for New York City in 1969 seeking international recognition, and after four decades of hard work, he has achieved notoriety but little commercial success. His wife Noriko, 21 years his junior, moved to New York at age more

  • The true story of Oscar, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who wakes up on the morning of December 31, 2008 and feels something in the air. Not sure what it is, he takes it as a sign to get a head start on his resolutions: being a better son to his mother, whose birthday falls on New Year’s Eve, being a better partner to his girlfriend, who he hasn’t been completely honest with as of late, and being a better father to T, their beautiful 4-year-old daughter. He starts out more

  • God Loves Uganda explores the role of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting dangerous religious bigotry. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and missionaries as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to fundamentalist Christianity. As an American influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the more

  • Inside Out — The People’s Art Project tracks the evolution of the biggest participatory art project in the world, the wildly popular Inside Out. Travel the globe with French artist JR as he motivates entire communities to define their most important causes with incredibly passionate displays of giant black and white portraits pasted in the street. We witness young and old taking ownership of walls that were previously restricted, and in doing so testing the limits of what they thought was possible. In capturing the process, Alastair Siddons creates a glowing more

  • Lila, a fourteen-year-old spends a hot summer in a blue-collar Brooklyn neighborhood far removed from the bustling city. Awkward, lonely, and often playing the third wheel, Lila is determined to emulate the sexual exploits of her more experienced best friend. She fixates on Sammy, a tough older guy, when she hears that “he’ll sleep with anyone.” Deluded in her romantic pursuit, Lila tries desperately to insert herself into Sammy’s gritty world, but in doing so she puts herself into a dangerously vulnerable situation.

  • Set against a vivid New York City backdrop, in the heart of Brooklyn, we are taken into the lives of both Lebo Mobama, owner and chef of a small African restaurant which he runs with his mother, Ma Lebo and his brother, Piet; and his fiancee, Mosa Matashane, who has waited six years to start a new life with Lebo in the States. Eager to uphold their African culture, Lebo and Mosa have a traditional Basotho wedding, filled with dance and music, culminating in a sensual ceremony where Mosa is named more

  • To a growing number of Mexicans and Latinos in the Americas, narco-traffickers have become iconic outlaws, glorified by musicians who praise their new models of fame and success. They represent a pathway out of the ghetto, nurturing a new American dream fueled by an addiction to money, drugs, and violence. Narco Cultura offers an explosive look at the drug cartels’ pop culture influence on both sides of the border as experienced by an LA narcocorrido singer dreaming of stardom and a Juarez crime scene investigator on the front line of more

  • Throughout Richard Nixon’s presidency, three of his top White House aides ­obsessively documented their experiences with Super 8 home movie cameras. Young, idealistic and dedicated, they had no idea that a few years later they’d all be in prison. This unique and personal visual record, created by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin, was seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation, then filed away and forgotten for almost 40 years. Our Nixon is an all-archival documentary presenting those home movies for the first time, along with other rare more

  • During the U.S. debate about healthcare reform, the media — reporters and news crews and filmmakers — failed to put a human face on what it means to not have access to healthcare. Remote Area Medical fills that gap — it is a film about people, not policy. Focusing on a single three-day clinic held in the Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee, Remote Area Medical affords us an insider’s perspective on the ebb and flow of the event — from the tense 3:30 a.m. ticket distribution that determines who gets more

  • Melissa Winters works as a cashier in a convenience store. It’s a dead end job, one dollar above minimum wage, but it’s as good as she can get. Her boyfriend, Richie Barnes (Matt Dillon) is permanently disabled from a motorcycle accident he had years ago. A former television repair man, Richie now lives month to month on a government disability check. He would love to get a real job, but instead, he drinks. Sunlight Jr. is a social issue film disguised as a love story. Melissa and Richie live together more

  • Before the ‘Teenager’ was invented, there was no second stage of life. You were either a child or you went to work as an adult. At the turn of the century, child labor was ending, ‘adolescence’ was emerging, and a struggle erupted between adults and youth. Would the young be controlled and regimented, or could they be free? Inspired by punk author Jon Savage’s book, Teenage gives voice to young people from the first half of the 20th century in America, England, and Germany — from party-crazed Flappers and hip more