• In 1983, after decades of steady deterioration, writer and academic John Hull became totally blind. To help him make sense of the upheaval in his life, he began keeping a diary on audio-cassette. Over three years he recorded in excess of sixteen hours of material — a unique testimony of loss, rebirth and renewal, which excavates the interior world of blindness. Notes on Blindness is based on the same source material as the 12-minute Emmy Award-winning New York Times Op-Doc, which premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival before going on more

  • Like many first generation immigrants, David Cho serves as the intermediary between his parents’ insular Koreatown life in Los Angeles and the frenetic landscape of the city. When the family restaurant is forced to close, the balance of the household is threatened and tension mounts at home. In an unfamiliar twist on more familiar immigrant stories, David does not accept his parents’ dreams for him to pursue an education and instead decides to help his family make ends meet by secretly taking a job at a Korean spa. There, David more

  • More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt further away or more out of sight. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a non-fiction film about the prison in which we never see an actual penitentiary. A medidation on the prison’s disappearance in the era of mass incarceration, the film unfolds a cinematic journey through a series of ordinary places across the USA where prisons do work and affect lives: from a more

  • In this tense and immersive tour de force, audiences are taken directly into the line of fire between powerful, opposing Peruvian leaders who will stop at nothing to keep their respective goals intact. On the one side is President Alan Garcia, who, eager to enter the world stage, begins aggressively extracting oil, minerals, and gas from untouched indigenous Amazonian land. He is quickly met with fierce opposition from indigenous leader Alberto Pizango, whose impassioned speeches against Garcia’s destructive actions prove a powerful rallying cry to throngs of his supporters. When Garcia more

  • In the summer of 1968, ABC News hired two great intellectuals to meet for televised debates during the presidential conventions. William F. Buckley was a leading light of the nascent neo-conservative movement — he’d founded the National Review in 1955. Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist and a Democrat by heritage, a cousin to Jackie Onasis. Vidal and Buckley each thought the other’s political ideologies were dangerous, even catastrophic for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they slugged out policy, personal insult, and revisionist histories staking out more

  • Sherwin is a good man, flawed like any other, but deeply invested in his family and in love with his wife, Fiona. When she returns from visiting her estranged and ill mother and acts distant, he shows concern. Their conversations lead to fights, the worst in their marriage. Fiona no longer sees herself as a mother; she does not want children. Sherwin is confused and angry. The life they have built begins to break down. And before there can be resolution, Fiona dies, in an auto accident after driving distractedly more

  • Mediterranea is the story of Ayiva, a 28-year old from Burkina Faso who seeks a better life in Europe, so he can provide for his wife and daughter back home. He and his best friend and brother-in-law Abas, go on a harrowing journey across the Sahara, where they are beaten, arrested, robbed, and forced to work menial jobs to earn money for their crossing. Then, Ayiva captains an overcrowded boat across the Mediterranean, and when a storm hits, many of the passengers drown. After arriving in Italy, and waiting for months to be more

  • All around the world, at any given moment, random people post personal video clips online. They are their virtual messages in a bottle, tossed into the boundless sea that is the Internet. Most of these posts flounder in a sad limbo of indifference and anonymity — unless your YouTube handle happens to be Princess Shaw. Samantha Montgomery, 38, lives on her own in one of New Orleans’ toughest neighborhoods. By day she works as a caregiver for the elderly; at night she transforms into Princess Shaw, belting out soulful originals more

  • The world’s largest salt flat, Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni, is a pristine, otherworldly expanse of white. For generations, the only signs of life have been the “saleros” who harvest salt from its radiant surface. This remote region is thrust into the future when Bolivia’s leaders embark on a plan to extract a precious mineral found beneath the salt crust, and to build an infrastructure connecting the Salar to the outside world. Salero, a nonfiction feature film, is a poetic journey through the eyes of Moises, one of the last remaining more

  • In 1952, Ousmane Sembéne, a dockworker and fifth-grade dropout from Senegal, began dreaming an impossible dream: to become the storyteller for a new Africa. SEMBENE!, a feature-length HD documentary, tells the unbelievable true story of the “father of African cinema,” the self-taught novelist and filmmaker who fought, against enormous odds, a monumental, 50-year-long battle to give African stories to Africans. SEMBENE! is told through the experiences of the man who knew him best, colleague and biographer Samba Gadjigo, using rare archival footage and more than 100 hours of exclusive materials. more

  • Johnny, a restless Lakota teen, and his spirited little sister Jashaun, live with their troubled mother on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. While Johnny looks for ways to escape his nihilistic life on the reservation by moving to LA with his girlfriend, Jashaun is holding onto her faith in the community and the simple pleasures she finds there. Things start to change after the funeral of their estranged cowboy father and Johnny’s reckless behavior begins to catch up with him. After finding out about Johnny’s plan to more

  • Like most teenage girls, Minnie Goetze (Bel Powley) is longing for love, acceptance and a sense of purpose in the world. Minnie begins a complex love affair with her mother’s (Kristen Wiig) boyfriend, “the handsomest man in the world,” Monroe Rutherford (Alexander Skarsgård). What follows is a sharp, funny and provocative account of one girl’s sexual and artistic awakening, without judgment. Set in 1976 San Francisco, The Diary of a Teenage Girl begins at the crossroads of the fading hippie movement and the dawn of punk rock. News commentary of the Patty Hearst trial echoes in the more

  • Tomboy Toni lands a spot on the Lionesses Dance Team, but when members of the group begin to experience a series of mysterious spasms — “the fits” — she fears how far she must go to fit in.

  • New England, 1630. Upon threat of banishment by the church, an English farmer leaves his colonial plantation, relocating his wife and five children to a remote plot of land on the edge of an ominous forest — within which lurks an unknown evil. Strange and unsettling things begin to happen almost immediately — animals turn malevolent, crops fail, and one child disappears as another becomes seemingly possessed by an evil spirit. With suspicion and paranoia mounting, family members accuse teenage daughter Thomasin of witchcraft, charges she adamantly denies. As circumstances more

  • In January 2013, filmmaker Laura Poitras was in the process of constructing a film about abuses of national security in post-9/11 America when she started receiving encrypted e-mails from someone identifying himself as “citizen four,” who was ready to blow the whistle on the massive covert surveillance programs run by the NSA and other intelligence agencies. In June 2013, she and reporter Glenn Greenwald flew to Hong Kong for the first of many meetings with the man who turned out to be Edward Snowden. She brought her camera with her. more

  • Dukhtar is a drama/thriller set in Pakistan. A mother kidnaps her ten-year-old daughter to save her from the fate of a child bride. Their daring escape triggers a relentless hunt. As their pursuers close in on them, mother and daughter meet a cynical truck driver who offers an unlikely hope. Their destinies entwined, the trio embark on an epic journey through the stunning landscape of Pakistan where the quest for love and freedom comes with a price.

  • E-Team is driven by the high-stakes investigative work of Anna Neistat, Fred Abrahams and Peter Bouckaert, three members of Human Rights Watch’s Emergency Team. Peter, a savvy strategist who lives with his family in Geneva, has been called “the James Bond of human-rights investigators” by Rolling Stone magazine. Fred is a tireless New York City native whose early investigations led him to face Slobodan Milosevic in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Anna draws upon her childhood experiences in the former USSR to feed her righteous indignation about more

  • Elephant’s Dream tells the story of a group of public sector workers who live in the third largest city in Africa, Kinshasa, DR Congo, where the weight of history has not stopped them from pursuing hopes and dreams. This film takes us beyond the usual reports of the Congo, to provide poetic and compassionate insight into a country in transition, as seen through the microcosm of three state-owned institutions, a rail-station, the central post-office and the only existing fire station in Kinshasa, a city of 10 million inhabitants. At times more

  • Darius Clark Monroe turns the camera on himself in order to present a more accurate image of one African American man against the backdrop of this country’s ongoing criminalization of his peers. Now a graduate of NYU Film School, Monroe Clark crafts an intricate and emotionally complex narrative of his own trajectory from straight-A student to bank robber, while ultimately reflecting on the racial and economic factors that surround his crime as he searches for answers and seeks forgiveness. One afternoon in the mid-1990s, a 16-year old Darius donned a more

  • Shot in East Africa using Somali non-actors, Fishing Without Nets tells the mesmerizing and sobering story of the pirates from the Somali point of view. First-time feature filmmaker Cutter Hodierne combines the epic cinematic vision of a glorious action-thriller with intimate, textured qualities of an art film, humanizing the pirates by bringing us inside their moral dilemmas and gut-wrenching struggles.