• Based on the nonfiction book by John D’Agata, About a Mountain is an essay film that explores the human need to know the truth and what happens when the answers we desperately seek are not so clear. The film follows three interwoven stories, all involving characters who  scramble for answers to personal, environmental, and philosophical challenges. Does the extensive scientific research done at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain ensure that nuclear waste can be safely stored there for one million years? When a bright and seemingly happy young man suddenly jumps off more

  • In 1964—just before Zambian Independence & in the midst of the Space Race—an eccentric freedom fighter turned schoolteacher, Mukuka Nkoloso, takes his students to a remote area to build a homemade rocket and set up an unofficial space program. He announces that he will send 17-year-old spacegirl Matha Mwamba to the moon with a missionary and two cats. Nkoloso has led many “impossible” projects before, but has he gone too far left-field this time?

  • After Yang follows a father and daughter as they try to save the life of their robotic family member.

  • Standing Rock, 2016: the largest Native American occupation since Wounded Knee, thousands of activists, environmentalists, and militarized police descend on the Dakota Access Pipeline, in a standoff between Big Oil and a new generation of native warriors. Embedded in the movement, native activist and filmmaker Cody Lucich chronicles the sweeping struggle in stunning clarity, as the forces battle through summer to bitter winter, capturing the spirit and havoc of an uprising.

  • Aleph is a mysterious point (an opening) suspended in space and time that contains the entire universe. It’s hidden in a splintered labyrinth where ten characters play a game of magic. Their collected thoughts serve as pieces of a puzzle that connect the labyrinth and lead to Aleph.

  • All Light, Everywhere explores the past, present, and future relationships between technology, vision, and power. From arcane theories of sight to the emergence of virtual reality and police body camera programs, the film takes a kaleidoscopic investigation into how the reality of what we see is constructed through the tools that we use to see.

  • Seen exclusively in virtual reality, Blackout immerses you in the NYC Subway during a mysterious power outage. Granted a telepathic ability, you gain access to the inner thoughts of passengers simply by moving from person to person. Confronted with a train car packed with people from all walks of life in the city, Blackout is a platform for New Yorkers to openly share their stories.

  • Javier Chocobar was shot fighting the removal of his indigenous community from their ancestral land in Argentina. His death appeared in a video on YouTube. This documentary unravels the 500 years of “reason” that led to this shooting, both with a gun and a camera, and contextualizes it in the system of land tenure that emerged across Latin America.

  • A zoo that rescues mythological creatures in psychedelic 1960’s San Francisco races the U.S. Military to find and save a Baku, a Japanese dream-eating cryptid, to prevent the military from using the Baku to eat the dreams of the counterculture and suppress the anti-Vietnam War movement. A hand-drawn, feature animated film.

  • Destiny (untitled) follows 26-year-old Destiny Frasqueri as she embarks on the next phase of her multi-faceted career.

  • Through intimate vérité, archival footage, and visually innovative treatments of her poetry, Going to Mars: The Nikki Giovanni Project pushes the boundaries of biographical documentary film to reveal the enduring influence of one of America’s greatest living artists and social commentators.

  • The ghosts of the past haunt the countryside in this tale of a Hawai‘i family facing the imminent death of their eldest.

  • One filmmaker searches to uncover her family’s Iranian past. A deeply personal story excavating the formative memories of her grandmother, mother, and self, Joonam explores the evolving shape of girlhood and with it the tender and turbulent relationships between mother and daughter, Iran and America, and the immigrant experience as it ripples over time.

  • Just a Band is about four Nairobians who drop out of university to form an Afro-electric pop band, a counter-narrative to the lives expected of them. Borrowing from a cultural mishmash of Sun Ra, Kung Fu Movies, Hip Hop and other bits of detritus, the film is a coming-of-age story in the middle of Kenya’s post-dictatorship art renaissance.

  • A spiritual drama about a British Pakistani rapper who, on the cusp of his first world tour, is struck down by an epigenetic illness that threatens to derail his big break.

  • My First Film is a retelling of the filmmakers failed attempt at making her first feature film. My First Film explores the relationship between an artist’s body and body of work, and is based on a performance of the same name.

  • A film about synthetic diamonds.

  • Silent is an elegant, at times unnerving, meditation on identity, loss, and redemption. The story centers around Isabella, whose unsettling reunion with Alex—a mysterious deaf man with whom she shares a veiled past—leads her on a dark, isolated path of self-discovery through a terrifying series of sensory experiments.

  • A poet composes a cinematic love letter to his grandmother as his homophobic aunt and drag queen uncle wage war over her estate in Hokes Bluff, Alabama. From director Bo McGuire: “Socks on Fire is a transgenerational docudrama couched in the battle royal for my Nanny’s throne. I returned home from New York City to find that my Aunt Sharon, my favorite childhood relative, had locked her gay, drag-queen brother, my Uncle John out of the family home. As a queer Southerner, who can be both equally protective and skeptical more

  • Growing up in 1970’s Detroit, Jeremy spent most of his time at his best friend Boo’s house, climbing mulberry trees and practicing kung fu. For a while, when Jeremy’s folks were struggling, Boo’s grandma took him in; he became family. When the boys hit puberty, the historical legacies of slavery — segregation, racism, violence — busted down the door of their home, collided with their bodies, and propelled Boo and Jeremy in two different directions. Jeremy became a white man and Boo a black man. Boo ended up in prison, more