• Based on the nonfiction book by John D’Agata, About a Mountain is an essay film that explores the human need to know the truth and what happens when the answers we desperately seek are not so clear. The film follows three interwoven stories, all involving characters who  scramble for answers to personal, environmental, and philosophical challenges. Does the extensive scientific research done at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain ensure that nuclear waste can be safely stored there for one million years? When a bright and seemingly happy young man suddenly jumps off more

  • Kathryn’s ALS has left her paralyzed and her family’s relations in tatters, but she holds on to see her daughter’s wedding. Drawn from more than 900 hours of intimate footage shot from Kathryn’s point of view, this film probes the breakdown both of a family’s bonds and of a woman’s will to live.

  • Through intimate vérité, archival footage, and visually innovative treatments of her poetry, Going to Mars: The Nikki Giovanni Project pushes the boundaries of biographical documentary film to reveal the enduring influence of one of America’s greatest living artists and social commentators.

  • Just a Band is about four Nairobians who drop out of university to form an Afro-electric pop band, a counter-narrative to the lives expected of them. Borrowing from a cultural mishmash of Sun Ra, Kung Fu Movies, Hip Hop and other bits of detritus, the film is a coming-of-age story in the middle of Kenya’s post-dictatorship art renaissance.

  • It’s 1992 and Milisuthando is enjoying her sheltered childhood in “The Republic of Transkei,” a semi-independent homeland “state” inside apartheid South Africa where even though apartheid is raging 100 km away, she has no idea of the impending racial calamity beyond her hometown. When Transkei is suddenly dissolved at the end of apartheid, 8-year-old Milisuthando becomes a member of the first generation of black kids to attend “Whites Only Model C” schools in South Africa. Through her probing, often naive journey with a cast of contrary characters, we revisit the more

  • In a mountain town, where corn and poppies grow the girls wear boyish haircuts and have hiding places underground to escape the threat of being stolen. Ana and her two best friends grow up together, affirming the bonds of their friendship and discovering what it means to be women in a rural town marked by violence. Their mothers train them to flee death, to escape those who turn them into slaves or ghosts. They create their own impenetrable universe, but one day one of the girls doesn’t make it to more

  • A film about synthetic diamonds.

  • Rojek is an intimate conversation with some of the most important members of the Islamic State (IS), who are currently being detained in Syria. As a backdrop, a country trying to stay vigilant as it struggles to recover from years of war.

  • Filmmaker and performer Jeremy Xido grew up in Detroit as the only white kid in his neighborhood, raised by neighbors who took him in when his parents were struggling. Twenty years ago, he left home and hasn’t gone back, haunted by something he left behind. Until now. Jeremy returns to the city to perform a stage piece he’s presented all over the world and to find out what happened to his childhood best friend, Boo. As he attempts to mount the show, his search for Boo takes over, unexpectedly thrusting more

  • The first-year students of an elitist religious school attend an integration camp outside the city. The tranquility is soon dissolved when a violent hole is found in the perimeter fence. This event creates a chain of mysterious incidents that will reveal a system created by the tutors to inject a fundamentalist view in the teenager’s minds.

  • When Death, a size shifting Macaw parrot, comes to collect teenage Tuesday, who is nearing the end of her life, the pair form an unexpected bond. Their connection compels him to grant more time so she can say goodbye to her mother, Zora. As the world slowly crumbles under the mounting pressure of Death’s absence, Zora’s desperate passion to keep her child alive leads her to attempt to kill the Macaw — and, when he won’t die, to consume him. But he cannot be destroyed easily, and when Tuesday realizes more