• All Light, Everywhere is an exploration of the shared histories of cameras, weapons, policing and justice. As surveillance technologies become a fixture in everyday life, the film interrogates the complexity of an objective point of view, probing the biases inherent in both human perception and the lens.

  • As cryptozookeepers struggle to capture a Baku (a legendary dream-eating hybrid creature) they begin to wonder if they should display these rare beasts in the confines of a cryptozoo or if these mythical creatures should remain hidden and unknown.

  • A family in Hawai’i faces the imminent death of their eldest as the ghosts of the past haunt the countryside.

  • Two Anishinaabe men are inextricably bound together after covering up the savage murder of a schoolmate. After years of separation following wildly divergent paths, they must finally confront how their traumatic secret has irrevocably shaped their lives.

  • A radical perspective that shifts focus from the idea of separateness to oneness. This film was recorded over several intense months during the Summer of 2019 in Harlem NY, Brussels and Haarlem, Netherlands. A film of formlessness out of the norm. The first film from this director this long. A more spiritual cinematic vision. And a continuation of tradition of polyphonic portraiture with something like a full album for a score.

  • A poet composes a cinematic love letter to his grandmother as his homophobic aunt and drag queen uncle wage war over her estate in Hokes Bluff, Alabama. From director Bo McGuire: “Socks on Fire is a transgenerational docudrama couched in the battle royal for my Nanny’s throne. I returned home from New York City to find that my Aunt Sharon, my favorite childhood relative, had locked her gay, drag-queen brother, my Uncle John out of the family home. As a queer Southerner, who can be both equally protective and skeptical more

  • In 1937, tens of thousands of Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent were exterminated by the Dominican army, based on anti-black hatred fomented by the Dominican government. Fast-forward to 2013, the Dominican Republic’s Supreme Court stripped the citizenship of anyone with Haitian parents, retroactive to 1929. The ruling rendered more than 200,000 people stateless, without nationality, identity or a homeland. In this dangerous climate, a young attorney named Rosa Iris mounts a grassroots campaign, challenging electoral corruption and advocating for social justice. Stateless traces the complex tributaries of history and more