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Untitled TMAC Documentary Project (Working Title)

Status
Type
Producers Margaret Bodde

Synopsis

A documentary feature film about Taylor Mac’s Award-Winning 24-Decade History of Popular Music, a 24-hour durational work charting American history through songs popular from 1776-2016. The film will feature performance, intercut with verité and scripted sequences that lend context and humor and sass to the themes and ideas in Taylor’s groundbreaking work. Taylor’s sly, subjective history will be explored and visualized, providing a chorus of commentary on the wildly entertaining performances presented in the film. Rare and select archival footage may be used as well to help illustrate Taylor’s uniquely brilliant vision. The film will extend the boundaries of the performance space so that we can contextualize Taylor’s performance as part of the American Experience.

About The Team

Ellen Kuras is a cinematographer and director whose body of work includes narrative and documentary films, music videos and commercials in both the studio and independent worlds. She is the three-time winner of the Award for Excellence in Dramatic Cinematography at the Sundance Film Festival, for her films Personal Velocity: Three Portraits, Angela and Swoon, which was her first dramatic feature after getting her start in political documentaries. In 2008, she released The Betrayal (Nerakhoon), her directorial debut, which she also wrote, produced and shot. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2009. In 2010, she won a Primetime Emmy Award for Exceptional Merit in Non-Fiction Filmmaking for the film.

Margaret Bodde is an award winning producer who has worked with Martin Scorsese for over two decades. She has been involved in numerous documentary projects, including The 50 Year Argument (2014); George Harrison: Living in the Material World (2011) for which she won an Emmy; No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005) for which she won a Grammy; Public Speaking (2010) about the writer Fran Lebowitz; and the seven-film series The Blues (2003).