• Why is it that some countries seem to be continually mired in cyclical wars, political instability and economic crises? The Democratic Republic of the Congo is one such a place, a mineral-rich Central African country that, over the last two decades, has seen more than five million conflict-related deaths, multiple regime changes and the wholesale impoverishment of its people. Yet though this ongoing conflict is the world’s bloodiest since WWII, little is known in the West about the players or stakes involved. This is Congo provides an immersive and unfiltered more

  • The Untitled Ramona S. Diaz Film explores the relationship between fear and the institutions empowered to protect us. Cinereach engages with film projects through a number of financing, production and support models. Untitled Ramona S. Diaz Film is a Cinereach grantee.

  • No bond is more profound than that between parent and child, and no role more primal than that of protector. That elemental bond is our point of entry for an immersive look at how war fractures families and the choices parents must make to protect and provide for their children. The film unfolds in chapters featuring Syrian families in Turkey, Greece, the U.S. and Syria. Each story is an intimate portrait of discrete human lives—with expectations and aspirations for their futures that have come to a crashing halt. The film more

  • Up Heartbreak Hill chronicles the lives of three high school seniors living on the Navajo Nation, struggling to shape their identities as both Native Americans and modern Americans. They must decide whether to stay in their community — a place inextricably woven into the fiber of their being — or leave in pursuit of educational and economic opportunities.

  • In the heart of Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, United Nations soldiers guard a heavily fortified building known as the “special court.” Inside, Issa Sesay awaits his trial. Prosecutors say Sesay is a war criminal, guilty of heinous crimes against humanity. His defenders say he is a reluctant fighter who protected civilians and played a crucial role in bringing peace to Sierra Leone. With unprecedented access to prosecutors, defense attorneys, victims, and, from behind bars, Sesay himself — War Don Don puts international justice on trial for the world more

  • Watchers of the Sky interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin — the man who created the word “genocide,” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, Watchers of the Sky takes you on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action.

  • With unprecedented access, What Tomorrow Brings goes inside the very first girls’ school in one small Afghan village. Never before have fathers here allowed their daughters to be educated, and they aren’t sure they even want to now. From the school’s beginnings in 2009 to its first graduation in 2015, the film traces the interconnected stories of students, teachers, village elders, parents, and school founder Razia Jan. While the girls learn to read and write, their education goes far beyond the classroom to become lessons about tradition and time. They discover more

  • In this tense and immersive tour de force, audiences are taken directly into the line of fire between powerful, opposing Peruvian leaders who will stop at nothing to keep their respective goals intact. On the one side is President Alan Garcia, who, eager to enter the world stage, begins aggressively extracting oil, minerals, and gas from untouched indigenous Amazonian land. He is quickly met with fierce opposition from indigenous leader Alberto Pizango, whose impassioned speeches against Garcia’s destructive actions prove a powerful rallying cry to throngs of his supporters. When Garcia more

  • Spanning the period from the outbreak of the Egyptian revolution in 2011 until the ouster or ex-President Morsi three years later, Whose Country? is a first-person account of one Cairo-based filmmaker’s interactions with a group of plainclothes policemen — the kind of security personnel who had become notorious in Egypt for widespread corruption and abuses of civilians — main causes for the January 25 uprising. Through verité footage and in one-on-one interviews, the policemen reveal the ways in which the security forces abused their role in society. At the same time, the filmmaker grapples with issues of more

  • The activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice bring you Whose Streets — a documentary about the Ferguson uprising. When Michael Brown is killed and left lying in the street for hours it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis. Grief, long-standing tension, and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil in protest of this latest tragedy. In the days that follow, artists, musicians, teachers and parents turn into freedom fighters, standing on the front lines to demand justice. As the national guard more

  • Every time 22-year-old Heba Afify heads out to cover the historical events shaping her country’s future, her mother is compelled to remind her, “I know you are a journalist, but you’re still a girl!” Defying cultural norms and family expectations, Heba takes to the streets to report on an Egypt in turmoil, using tweets, texts and Facebook posts. Her coming of age, political awakening and the disillusionment that follows, mirrors that of a nation seeking the freedom to shape its own destiny, dignity and democracy.