• What does it mean to have a penthouse in poverty-filled Brazil? Interweaving resident interviews and vistas from above, High-Rise (Um Lugar ao Sol) is a hypnotic and revealing examination of the real view from the top. This feature length documentary presents an analysis of the dominant Brazilian classes through a dialogue with the inhabitants of nine penthouse apartments in the cities of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Recife. During the film, penthouse residents open up their homes to reveal their thoughts on social inequality, politics, and the world that surrounds more

  • In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing an unavoidable endeavor he was about to embark on: the writing of his last book, Remember This House. The book would be an account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his friends — Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers and Malcolm X. Their murders permanently traumatized an entire generation. James Baldwin was never able to go beyond 30 pages before he died. The manuscript, Notes toward Remember This House, was entrusted to Raoul Peck by the more

  • In December 2005, Daniel McGowan was arrested by Federal agents in a nationwide sweep of radical environmentalists involved with the Earth Liberation Front — a group the FBI has called America’s “number one domestic terrorism threat.” For years, the ELF — operating in separate anonymous cells without any central leadership — had launched spectacular arsons against dozens of businesses they accused of destroying the environment: timber companies, SUV dealerships, wild horse slaughterhouses, and a $12 million ski lodge at Vail, Colorado. With the arrest of Daniel and thirteen others, the government had cracked more

  • An epic tragedy of corruption and betrayal, Impeachment is a behind-the-scenes look at the ousting of Brazil’s first female president, Dilma Rousseff. With privileged access to the president and other key politicians, the film unravels like a political thriller in what is not only a defining moment for Brazil but also a fable of our times.

  • Informant examines Brandon Darby, a radical activist turned FBI informant who has been both vilified and deified, but never entirely understood. In 2005, Darby became an overnight activist hero when he traveled to Katrina-devastated New Orleans and braved toxic floodwaters to rescue a friend stranded in the Ninth Ward. Soon after, he became a founding member of Common Ground, a successful grassroots relief organization. After two young activists were arrested at the 2008 Republican National Convention, Darby shocked close friends and activists nationwide by revealing he had been instrumental in more

  • Inside Out — The People’s Art Project tracks the evolution of the biggest participatory art project in the world, the wildly popular Inside Out. Travel the globe with French artist JR as he motivates entire communities to define their most important causes with incredibly passionate displays of giant black and white portraits pasted in the street. We witness young and old taking ownership of walls that were previously restricted, and in doing so testing the limits of what they thought was possible. In capturing the process, Alastair Siddons creates a glowing more

  • After 14 years of a brutal civil war, Liberia elects its first female president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, nicknamed the Iron Lady. With her predominately female cabinet, President Johnson Sirleaf struggles during her first year in office to rebuild a war-ravaged country, fight rampant corruption and prevent a descent back into war. Iron Ladies of Liberia is a unique look behind the scenes at the rebirth of a nation and democracy in action, under the steady hand of women determined to make history and move their country forward.

  • For a year the filmmaker submerged herself in documenting the secret activities of environmental direct action activists in the UK. The result is a behind the scenes portrait of a community of actively engaged citizens who aren’t prepared to sit back and allow the destruction of the world’s ecosystems and climate. The individuals in the film have picked up the mantle of civil disobedience and direct action — chaining themselves to aeroplanes, super-gluing themselves to bank trading floors, and attacking coal power stations en-masse. Their adventures will entertain, illuminate and inspire.

  • In the middle of the night a red fire truck rushes through the streets. We meet Mahmoud and Subhi inside the car engaged in discussion: Are we going to die now? They follow the smell of what they fear is a chemical bomb attack. This is Aleppo, where death surrounds you. Dark and empty with deserted buildings, telling the story of a thousand disrupted lives. Through this trip, searching for survivors, we experience the personal story behind the war. Khalid, Subhi and Mahmoud, all founding members of the White Helmets more

  • Imagine if Grey Gardens’ Little Edie had actually realized her dream of moving into a studio apartment on 10th Avenue: her life might have resembled that of Laura’s, a Brazilian expat in New York City who lives two contradictory lives. (Synopsis by The Hamptons Film Festival)

  • An artisan gold-mining village in rural Colombia is on the precipice of opportunity and destruction as a Canadian mining company plans a massive regional investment. For five centuries these miners have lived in the lush Andes Mountains; the gold being their only source of sustenance. This intimate portrait follows the lives of the villagers as they struggle to preserve their centuries old way of life and confront the arrival of large-scale mining operations.

  • MATANGI / MAYA / M.I.A. is drawn from a cache of personal tapes shot by Maya Arulpragasm and her closest friends over the last 22 years, capturing her remarkable journey from immigrant teenager in London, to the international popstar M.I.A. Inspired by her roots, M.I.A. created a mashup, cut-and-paste identity that pulled from every corner of her journey; a sonic sketchbook that blended Tamil politics, Art school punk, hip-hop beats and the voice of multicultural youth. Never compromising, Maya kept her camera rolling through her battles with the music industry more

  • In 2015, Hassan Fazili’s documentary Peace aired on Afghan national television. After it aired, the Taliban assassinated the film’s main subject and put a price on Hassan’s head. He looked at his wife and his daughters, and he knew they had to flee their home. Over the course of their multi-year saga in search of safety, the family grasps onto the only means they have to assert control over their situation: their three camera phones. Hassan and his wife Fatima are both filmmakers, and they are educating their daughters and encouraging more

  • Kimberley defends Western and Afghan clients accused of criminal actions in the Afghan legal system. At first, she came to Afghanistan for the money, but then it became about something else. Kimberley — who had never before left the US — saw how poorly the legal system in Afghanistan was run and how this part of Afghan society had been totally neglected by the international community. For over five years now, human rights cases and troubled expats have motivated her to stay, but personal threats, and the general condition in the country, more

  • To a growing number of Mexicans and Latinos in the Americas, narco-traffickers have become iconic outlaws, glorified by musicians who praise their new models of fame and success. They represent a pathway out of the ghetto, nurturing a new American dream fueled by an addiction to money, drugs, and violence. Narco Cultura offers an explosive look at the drug cartels’ pop culture influence on both sides of the border as experienced by an LA narcocorrido singer dreaming of stardom and a Juarez crime scene investigator on the front line of more

  • In 1983, after decades of steady deterioration, writer and academic John Hull became totally blind. To help him make sense of the upheaval in his life, he began keeping a diary on audio-cassette. Over three years he recorded in excess of sixteen hours of material — a unique testimony of loss, rebirth and renewal, which excavates the interior world of blindness. Notes on Blindness is based on the same source material as the 12-minute Emmy Award-winning New York Times Op-Doc, which premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival before going on more

  • October Country is a portrait of an American family struggling for stability while haunted by the ghosts of war, teen pregnancy, foster care and child abuse. It examines the forces that unsettle the working poor and the violence that lurks beneath the surface of American life. Every family has its ghosts — some metaphorical, some literal. The Mosher family has more than most. Shot over a year from one Halloween to the next, the film uses rich visual metaphors and floats through multiple storylines to paint a portrait of a family more

  • A film about synthetic diamonds.

  • Throughout Richard Nixon’s presidency, three of his top White House aides ­obsessively documented their experiences with Super 8 home movie cameras. Young, idealistic and dedicated, they had no idea that a few years later they’d all be in prison. This unique and personal visual record, created by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin, was seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation, then filed away and forgotten for almost 40 years. Our Nixon is an all-archival documentary presenting those home movies for the first time, along with other rare more

  • Out in the Night is a documentary that tells the story of a group of young friends, African American lesbians who are out one hot August night in 2006 in the gay friendly neighborhood of New York City. They are all in their late teens and early twenties and come from a low-income neighborhood in Newark, New Jersey. Two of the women are the focus — gender non-conforming Renata Hill, a single mother with a soft heart and keen sense of humor, and petite femme Patreese Johnson, a shy and tender more