• In the summer of 1968, ABC News hired two great intellectuals to meet for televised debates during the presidential conventions. William F. Buckley was a leading light of the nascent neo-conservative movement — he’d founded the National Review in 1955. Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist and a Democrat by heritage, a cousin to Jackie Onasis. Vidal and Buckley each thought the other’s political ideologies were dangerous, even catastrophic for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they slugged out policy, personal insult, and revisionist histories staking out more

  • Part film, part baptism, director Khalik Allah cast his lens between the prostitutes and churches of Jamaica, the result is a nuanced polyphonic symphony, heightened by a level of intimacy and complete immersion in spirit. A timely respite from the bad news and a response thereto — a film punctuated by prayers, scored with laughter and fortified with hope. Allah introduces us to a succession of vibrant, idiosyncratic souls who call this island home. Their candid testimonies provide a penetrating glimpse into this misunderstood corner of the world and also more

  • The National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico is a site of festivity unlike any other in the world. In celebration of San Juan de Dios, patron saint of firework makers, conflagrant revelry engulfs the town for ten days. Artisans show off their technical virtuosity, up-­and-comers create their own rowdy, lo­fi combustibles, and dozens of teams build larger-than-life papier­-mâché bulls to parade into the town square, adorned with fireworks that blow up in all directions. More than three quarters of Tultepec’s residents work in pyrotechnics, making the festival more than revelry more

  • In 2011, a mysterious news story goes viral: the tiny bucolic village of Bugarach in southern France will be ground zero for surviving the apocalypse foretold by the Mayans on December 21, 2012. The 194 residents take it as a joke, yet within months, the charismatic mayor sees his quaint village transformed into a hive of quirky characters seeking answers to their respective inner voids as they ride out the apocalypse: tourists, dodgy journalists, speculators, hippie communes and cults from around the world. Property prices quadruple. RV communities spring up more

  • Each story in Bully represents a different facet of Americas bullying crisis. The Bully Project follows five kids and families over the course of a school year. Stories include two families who have lost children to suicide and a mother awaiting the fate of her 14-year-old daughter who has been incarcerated after bringing a gun on her school bus. With an intimate glimpse into homes, classrooms, cafeterias and principals offices, the film offers insight into the often cruel world of the lives of bullied children. As teachers, administrators, kids and more

  • Burma Soldier provides a rare glimpse of a brutal dictatorship seen through the eyes of a courageous former soldier who, quite literally, swapped sides. The documentary offers an exclusive and rare perspective, from inside the heart and mind of a former Burmese soldier who lays bare an understanding of a brutal regime and the political and psychological power of the junta over this country.

  • Detroit is an iconic city. Go anywhere in the world, say “Detroit,” and it strikes a set of images — Motown, Hockeytown, Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, 8 Mile … Also crime, foreclosures, poverty, white flight, race … and fire. But these are mere snapshots, glimpses into a deeper, more complex panorama. No one understands this better than the people literally putting out the fires, battling every day in an uncertain war. BURN is a character-driven documentary about Detroit, told through the eyes of Detroiters who are on the front lines more