• Amal is a feisty teenager growing up in post-revolution Egypt while they’re both undergoing a tremendous change. Within a constant political turmoil, Amal searches for her place, identity, and sexuality in a patriarchal society. Amal, whose name literally translates to “hope”, is embarking on a 6-year compelling journey from childhood to adulthood. Along the way, she realizes her limited options as a woman living in an Arab police state.

  • Directors Fabrizio Lazzaretti and Paolo Santolini weave together the stories of two children affected by war during their stays in the caring hands of Italian aid organization Emergency. Yagoub fled with his family from Darfur to the Mayo Refugee Camp in Khartoum. He has to undergo a serious heart operation, but neither his family nor his fellow tribesmen can come up with the money to pay for it. Murtaza is recuperating in a hospital in Kabul after losing his left hand to a landmine.

  • The subjects of Before You Know It are no ordinary senior citizens. They are go-go booted bar-hoppers, love struck activists, troublemaking baton twirlers, late night Internet cruisers, seasoned renegades and bold adventurers. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans over the age of 55 in the United States, many of whom face heightened levels of discrimination, neglect and exclusion. But Before is not a film about cold statistics and gloomy realities, it’s a film about generational trailblazers who have surmounted prejudice and defied expectation more

  • In the summer of 1968, ABC News hired two great intellectuals to meet for televised debates during the presidential conventions. William F. Buckley was a leading light of the nascent neo-conservative movement — he’d founded the National Review in 1955. Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist and a Democrat by heritage, a cousin to Jackie Onasis. Vidal and Buckley each thought the other’s political ideologies were dangerous, even catastrophic for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they slugged out policy, personal insult, and revisionist histories staking out more

  • Part film, part baptism, director Khalik Allah casts his lens between the prostitutes and churches of Jamaica; creating a visual prayer of indelible portraits and an intimate polyphonic symphony.

  • The National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico is a site of festivity unlike any other in the world. In celebration of San Juan de Dios, patron saint of firework makers, conflagrant revelry engulfs the town for ten days. Artisans show off their technical virtuosity, up-­and-comers create their own rowdy, lo­fi combustibles, and dozens of teams build larger-than-life papier­-mâché bulls to parade into the town square, adorned with fireworks that blow up in all directions. More than three quarters of Tultepec’s residents work in pyrotechnics, making the festival more than revelry more

  • In 2011, a mysterious news story goes viral: the tiny bucolic village of Bugarach in southern France will be ground zero for surviving the apocalypse foretold by the Mayans on December 21, 2012. The 194 residents take it as a joke, yet within months, the charismatic mayor sees his quaint village transformed into a hive of quirky characters seeking answers to their respective inner voids as they ride out the apocalypse: tourists, dodgy journalists, speculators, hippie communes and cults from around the world. Property prices quadruple. RV communities spring up more