• 25 to Life is a feature documentary film about William Brawner, a young man who kept his HIV status a secret for over twenty-five years, since he was two years old. Now he seeks redemption from his promiscuous past, and embarks on a new phase of life with his wife who is HIV Negative.

  • Fourteen centuries after the revelation of the holy Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad, Islam today is the world’s second largest and fastest growing religion. Muslim gay filmmaker Parvez Sharma travels the many worlds of this dynamic faith, discovering the stories of its most unlikely storytellers: lesbian and gay Muslims. Produced by Sandi DuBowski (Trembling Before G-d) and Sharma, A Jihad for Love was filmed in 12 countries and 9 languages and comes from the heart of Islam. Looking beyond a hostile and war-torn present, it reclaims the Islamic concept of a more

  • A young Kenyan’s life is changed dramatically when his education is sponsored by a Swedish stranger. Years later, he founds his own scholarship program to replicate the kindness he once received. But can he have the same impact on a new generation?

  • Ai Weiwei is China’s most famous international artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. First-time director Alison Klayman gained more

  • Standing Rock, 2016: the largest Native American occupation since Wounded Knee, thousands of activists, environmentalists, and militarized police descend on the Dakota Access Pipeline, in a standoff between Big Oil and a new generation of native warriors. Embedded in the movement, native activist and filmmaker Cody Lucich chronicles the sweeping struggle in stunning clarity, as the forces battle through summer to bitter winter, capturing the spirit and havoc of an uprising.

  • All Light, Everywhere explores the past, present, and future relationships between technology, vision, and power. From arcane theories of sight to the emergence of virtual reality and police body camera programs, the film takes a kaleidoscopic investigation into how the reality of what we see is constructed through the tools that we use to see.

  • Between Azerbaijan and Armenia, men young and old labor to build a new railroad promising to bring glory to a new generation.  Meanwhile, across closed borders, a lonely stationmaster sits idle in suspended time, waiting for twenty five years for the return of trains.  Across the closed borders of Eurasia, men reflect upon their desires and regrets, floating through the expanse striving to fill their days and dreams, as much as their pockets.

  • Amal is a feisty teenager growing up in post-revolution Egypt while they’re both undergoing a tremendous change. Within a constant political turmoil, Amal searches for her place, identity, and sexuality in a patriarchal society. Amal, whose name literally translates to “hope”, is embarking on a 6-year compelling journey from childhood to adulthood. Along the way, she realizes her limited options as a woman living in an Arab police state.

  • Directors Fabrizio Lazzaretti and Paolo Santolini weave together the stories of two children affected by war during their stays in the caring hands of Italian aid organization Emergency. Yagoub fled with his family from Darfur to the Mayo Refugee Camp in Khartoum. He has to undergo a serious heart operation, but neither his family nor his fellow tribesmen can come up with the money to pay for it. Murtaza is recuperating in a hospital in Kabul after losing his left hand to a landmine.

  • The subjects of Before You Know It are no ordinary senior citizens. They are go-go booted bar-hoppers, love struck activists, troublemaking baton twirlers, late night Internet cruisers, seasoned renegades and bold adventurers. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans over the age of 55 in the United States, many of whom face heightened levels of discrimination, neglect and exclusion. But Before is not a film about cold statistics and gloomy realities, it’s a film about generational trailblazers who have surmounted prejudice and defied expectation more

  • In the summer of 1968, ABC News hired two great intellectuals to meet for televised debates during the presidential conventions. William F. Buckley was a leading light of the nascent neo-conservative movement — he’d founded the National Review in 1955. Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist and a Democrat by heritage, a cousin to Jackie Onasis. Vidal and Buckley each thought the other’s political ideologies were dangerous, even catastrophic for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they slugged out policy, personal insult, and revisionist histories staking out more

  • Part film, part baptism, director Khalik Allah casts his lens between the prostitutes and churches of Jamaica; creating a visual prayer of indelible portraits and an intimate polyphonic symphony.

  • The National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico is a site of festivity unlike any other in the world. In celebration of San Juan de Dios, patron saint of firework makers, conflagrant revelry engulfs the town for ten days. Artisans show off their technical virtuosity, up-­and-comers create their own rowdy, lo­fi combustibles, and dozens of teams build larger-than-life papier­-mâché bulls to parade into the town square, adorned with fireworks that blow up in all directions. More than three quarters of Tultepec’s residents work in pyrotechnics, making the festival more than revelry more

  • In 2011, a mysterious news story goes viral: the tiny bucolic village of Bugarach in southern France will be ground zero for surviving the apocalypse foretold by the Mayans on December 21, 2012. The 194 residents take it as a joke, yet within months, the charismatic mayor sees his quaint village transformed into a hive of quirky characters seeking answers to their respective inner voids as they ride out the apocalypse: tourists, dodgy journalists, speculators, hippie communes and cults from around the world. Property prices quadruple. RV communities spring up more

  • Each story in Bully represents a different facet of Americas bullying crisis. The Bully Project follows five kids and families over the course of a school year. Stories include two families who have lost children to suicide and a mother awaiting the fate of her 14-year-old daughter who has been incarcerated after bringing a gun on her school bus. With an intimate glimpse into homes, classrooms, cafeterias and principals offices, the film offers insight into the often cruel world of the lives of bullied children. As teachers, administrators, kids and more

  • Burma Soldier provides a rare glimpse of a brutal dictatorship seen through the eyes of a courageous former soldier who, quite literally, swapped sides. The documentary offers an exclusive and rare perspective, from inside the heart and mind of a former Burmese soldier who lays bare an understanding of a brutal regime and the political and psychological power of the junta over this country.

  • Detroit is an iconic city. Go anywhere in the world, say “Detroit,” and it strikes a set of images — Motown, Hockeytown, Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, 8 Mile … Also crime, foreclosures, poverty, white flight, race … and fire. But these are mere snapshots, glimpses into a deeper, more complex panorama. No one understands this better than the people literally putting out the fires, battling every day in an uncertain war. BURN is a character-driven documentary about Detroit, told through the eyes of Detroiters who are on the front lines more

  • In an unmarked office at the end of a dirt track, Uganda’s first openly gay man, David Kato, labors to repeal his country’s homophobic laws and liberate his fellow LGBT men and women, or “kuchus.” But this formidable task becomes even more difficult when the Anti-Homosexuality Bill is introduced, proposing death for gay men and prison for anyone who fails to turn in a rumored homosexual. Inspired by American evangelicals who have christened Uganda ground zero in their war on the “homosexual agenda,” the bill awaits a vote in Uganda’s more

  • Casting JonBenet is a sly and stylized exploration of the world’s most sensational child-murder case, the still unsolved death of six-year-old American beauty queen, JonBenet Ramsey. Over 15 months, the filmmakers traveled to the Ramsey’s Colorado hometown to elicit responses, reflections and performances from the local community, creating a bold work of art born from the collective memories and mythologies the crime inspired.

  • Set in Uganda, Children of War chronicles the daily struggle towards rehabilitation and reconciliation by a group of recently escaped child soldiers of the Lord’s Resistance Army, one of the world’s longest running and most brutal guerrilla militias.