• Based on the nonfiction book by John D’Agata, About a Mountain is an essay film that explores the human need to know the truth and what happens when the answers we desperately seek are not so clear. The film follows three interwoven stories, all involving characters who  scramble for answers to personal, environmental, and philosophical challenges. Does the extensive scientific research done at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain ensure that nuclear waste can be safely stored there for one million years? When a bright and seemingly happy young man suddenly jumps off more

  • Aleph is a mysterious point (an opening) suspended in space and time that contains the entire universe. It’s hidden in a splintered labyrinth where ten characters play a game of magic. Their collected thoughts serve as pieces of a puzzle that connect the labyrinth and lead to Aleph.

  • After a woman fails to show up for their date, an artist ponders the divide between romantic and platonic love, and why his past relationships have failed.

  • Seen exclusively in virtual reality, Blackout immerses you in the NYC Subway during a mysterious power outage. Granted a telepathic ability, you gain access to the inner thoughts of passengers simply by moving from person to person. Confronted with a train car packed with people from all walks of life in the city, Blackout is a platform for New Yorkers to openly share their stories.

  • In 2013 the Supreme Court of the Dominican Republic upheld legislation that stripped citizenship from individuals of Haitian heritage born in that country. Hispaniola is a feature documentary that will take audiences on a cinematic journey through the day-to-day lives of people directly impacted by these new laws. There is Elena Lorac, a young Dominican of Haitian descent whose fall into statelessness has rendered her invisible, forced to function below the radar and avoid confrontation when attacked because of her ancestry; Amelia Deschamps is a Dominican journalist who has spoken more

  • Some people believe that the last thought we have, before we die, is where we will spend eternity. I Remember When I Die explores memory’s relationship with matter, the value of remembering and the fear of being forgotten. Set in a hospice, the patients are asked to choose the memory they will think of when they die. Dramatically, the film works with shifts in time and place, rather than building a story chronologically. Actors will help memories into shape and scientists will be approaching the hypothetical design of a personal eternity.

  • Leviathan is a feature-length film about men at sea and fish on boats. It offers an appreciation for the sensory experience, labor, and political and ecological stakes of one of the oldest endeavors that has been an important part of human history since the Paleolithic. Shot off the coast of the mythic city of Moby Dick, with eleven cameras swapping hands between the filmmakers and fishermen, in an effort to create a form of collective experimentation that gives free reign to the perspectives of both fishermen and their catch, the more

  • Love True pushes the documentary genre further into new realms as it looks into the opposing realities of the “True Love” fantasy. Does our view of love change as we grow older? How do we make decisions about our love lives? Is there such a thing as true love? Are there invisible partners in our relationships? Past ghosts of ourselves? The film’s reenactments of significant past experiences and glimpses at possible futures, created with non-actors playing the characters’ older and younger selves, encourage the couples to confront the realities of more

  • Mammoth follows a young girl as she travels the world meeting those behind the race to clone and “de-extinct” the woolly mammoth. Our precocious guide interrogates the scientists who are pursuing this project as well as those who are against it: priests, ethicists, and native peoples. She eventually teams up with a blind Yukagir poet deep in Siberia, whose ancestors hunted the mammoth, on a journey that reveals the truly terrifying implications of this new technology. Not only are we on the cusp of bringing this Pleistocene beast back to more

  • Growing up in 1970’s Detroit, Jeremy spent most of his time at his best friend Boo’s house, climbing mulberry trees and practicing kung fu. For a while, when Jeremy’s folks were struggling, Boo’s grandma took him in; he became family. When the boys hit puberty, the historical legacies of slavery — segregation, racism, violence — busted down the door of their home, collided with their bodies, and propelled Boo and Jeremy in two different directions. Jeremy became a white man and Boo a black man. Boo ended up in prison, more

  • Somewhere in this lost world, a mysterious City is hiding. Five hundred years ago a group of conquerors disappeared in Patagonia. They built a City entirely in Gold. They are alive. Whoever sets foot on it becomes immortal, but loses memory. It is the City of the Lost Caesars and you have come here to find it.

  • Romulo, a private investigator, has been hired to do a study of a retirement home where residents are thought to be victims of abuse. To this end, he trains an 83-year-old man to live as a Mole Agent inside the home. Once inside, the mole struggles to assume his detective role as he gradually becomes one more resident in it.

  • A documentary feature film about Taylor Mac’s Award-Winning 24-Decade History of Popular Music, a 24-hour durational work charting American history through songs popular from 1776-2016. The film will feature performance, intercut with verité and scripted sequences that lend context and humor and sass to the themes and ideas in Taylor’s groundbreaking work. Taylor’s sly, subjective history will be explored and visualized, providing a chorus of commentary on the wildly entertaining performances presented in the film. Rare and select archival footage may be used as well to help illustrate Taylor’s uniquely more