• The largest domestic natural gas drilling boom in history has swept across the United States. The Halliburton-developed drilling technology of “fracking” or hydraulic fracturing, has unlocked a “Saudia Arabia of natural gas” just beneath us. But is fracking safe? When filmmaker Josh Fox is asked to lease his land for drilling, he embarks on a cross-country odyssey uncovering a trail of secrets, lies and contamination. A recently drilled nearby Pennsylvania town reports that residents are able to light their drinking water on fire. This is just one of the many more

  • Girl Model follows U.S. and Russian model scouts who travel through remote Siberian villages looking for thirteen to fifteen-year-old girls suitable for modeling jobs in Japan. This poetic film brings viewers into a modeling industry rife with mirrors, images, facades, and uncertainty. It is difficult to know who these young girls can trust and where the industry takes them when their eyes are covered.

  • God Loves Uganda explores the role of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting dangerous religious bigotry. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and missionaries as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to fundamentalist Christianity. As an American influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. The film reveals the more

  • Will Shepard is an American satellite-mapping engineer contracted to create a new, more accurate survey of the country of Armenia. Within the industry, his solitary work – land-surveying satellite images to check for accuracy and resolve anomalies – is called “ground-truthing.” He’s been doing it on his own, for years, all over the world, but on this trip, his measurements are not adding up. Will meets Gadarine Najarian at a rural hotel. Tough and intriguing, she’s an expatriate Armenian art photographer on her first trip back in ages, passionately trying more

  • Based in San Diego’s indie music and art scene, I Am Not a Hipster features original song performances and explores what it means to be creative in the face of tragedy.

  • In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing an unavoidable endeavor he was about to embark on: the writing of his last book, Remember This House. The book would be an account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his friends — Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers and Malcolm X. Their murders permanently traumatized an entire generation. James Baldwin was never able to go beyond 30 pages before he died. The manuscript, Notes toward Remember This House, was entrusted to Raoul Peck by the more

  • In December 2005, Daniel McGowan was arrested by Federal agents in a nationwide sweep of radical environmentalists involved with the Earth Liberation Front — a group the FBI has called America’s “number one domestic terrorism threat.” For years, the ELF — operating in separate anonymous cells without any central leadership — had launched spectacular arsons against dozens of businesses they accused of destroying the environment: timber companies, SUV dealerships, wild horse slaughterhouses, and a $12 million ski lodge at Vail, Colorado. With the arrest of Daniel and thirteen others, the government had cracked more

  • Informant examines Brandon Darby, a radical activist turned FBI informant who has been both vilified and deified, but never entirely understood. In 2005, Darby became an overnight activist hero when he traveled to Katrina-devastated New Orleans and braved toxic floodwaters to rescue a friend stranded in the Ninth Ward. Soon after, he became a founding member of Common Ground, a successful grassroots relief organization. After two young activists were arrested at the 2008 Republican National Convention, Darby shocked close friends and activists nationwide by revealing he had been instrumental in more

  • Inside Out — The People’s Art Project tracks the evolution of the biggest participatory art project in the world, the wildly popular Inside Out. Travel the globe with French artist JR as he motivates entire communities to define their most important causes with incredibly passionate displays of giant black and white portraits pasted in the street. We witness young and old taking ownership of walls that were previously restricted, and in doing so testing the limits of what they thought was possible. In capturing the process, Alastair Siddons creates a glowing more

  • Lila, a fourteen-year-old spends a hot summer in a blue-collar Brooklyn neighborhood far removed from the bustling city. Awkward, lonely, and often playing the third wheel, Lila is determined to emulate the sexual exploits of her more experienced best friend. She fixates on Sammy, a tough older guy, when she hears that “he’ll sleep with anyone.” Deluded in her romantic pursuit, Lila tries desperately to insert herself into Sammy’s gritty world, but in doing so she puts herself into a dangerously vulnerable situation.

  • For a year the filmmaker submerged herself in documenting the secret activities of environmental direct action activists in the UK. The result is a behind the scenes portrait of a community of actively engaged citizens who aren’t prepared to sit back and allow the destruction of the world’s ecosystems and climate. The individuals in the film have picked up the mantle of civil disobedience and direct action — chaining themselves to aeroplanes, super-gluing themselves to bank trading floors, and attacking coal power stations en-masse. Their adventures will entertain, illuminate and inspire.

  • New York City, 1997. Erik Rothman is another gay man trying to make a connection through a phone sex line when he meets Paul Lucy, closeted, handsome, and with a girlfriend attached. What begins as a highly charged first encounter between the two men soon extends itself into a hopeful moment between potential lovers. As Erik negotiates life as a documentary filmmaker, his relationship with Paul, a precociously successful entertainment lawyer, increasingly becomes something more than just a fling. As the connection grows stronger, they share secrets, friends, drugs and more

  • During the 1994 Rwandan genocide, as the country became a slaughterhouse, mosques became places of refuge where Muslims, Christians, Hutus and Tutsis came together to protect each other. Inspired by true stories, Kinyarwanda interweaves six tales that provide a complex and real depiction of life and human resilience in the face of unimaginable danger.

  • In the middle of the night a red fire truck rushes through the streets. We meet Mahmoud and Subhi inside the car engaged in discussion: Are we going to die now? They follow the smell of what they fear is a chemical bomb attack. This is Aleppo, where death surrounds you. Dark and empty with deserted buildings, telling the story of a thousand disrupted lives. Through this trip, searching for survivors, we experience the personal story behind the war. Khalid, Subhi and Mahmoud, all founding members of the White Helmets more

  • Imagine if Grey Gardens’ Little Edie had actually realized her dream of moving into a studio apartment on 10th Avenue: her life might have resembled that of Laura’s, a Brazilian expat in New York City who lives two contradictory lives. (Synopsis by The Hamptons Film Festival)

  • Leviathan is a feature-length film about men at sea and fish on boats. It offers an appreciation for the sensory experience, labor, and political and ecological stakes of one of the oldest endeavors that has been an important part of human history since the Paleolithic. Shot off the coast of the mythic city of Moby Dick, with eleven cameras swapping hands between the filmmakers and fishermen, in an effort to create a form of collective experimentation that gives free reign to the perspectives of both fishermen and their catch, the more

  • Set in an unidentified world at war, this is the story of a woman making a dangerous journey home. When her guide is killed on the road in an arbitrary act of violence, the woman is forced to rely on a young man, who agrees to travel with her for a price. Increasingly unable to distinguish between reality and hallucination, the woman finds comfort in her relationship with the man and in the presence of a mysterious child from her past. An intense character and landscape study, Look, Stranger is more

  • Love True pushes the documentary genre further into new realms as it looks into the opposing realities of the “True Love” fantasy. Does our view of love change as we grow older? How do we make decisions about our love lives? Is there such a thing as true love? Are there invisible partners in our relationships? Past ghosts of ourselves? The film’s reenactments of significant past experiences and glimpses at possible futures, created with non-actors playing the characters’ older and younger selves, encourage the couples to confront the realities of more

  • An artisan gold-mining village in rural Colombia is on the precipice of opportunity and destruction as a Canadian mining company plans a massive regional investment. For five centuries these miners have lived in the lush Andes Mountains; the gold being their only source of sustenance. This intimate portrait follows the lives of the villagers as they struggle to preserve their centuries old way of life and confront the arrival of large-scale mining operations.

  • Mediterranea is the story of Ayiva, a 28-year old from Burkina Faso who seeks a better life in Europe, so he can provide for his wife and daughter back home. He and his best friend and brother-in-law Abas, go on a harrowing journey across the Sahara, where they are beaten, arrested, robbed, and forced to work menial jobs to earn money for their crossing. Then, Ayiva captains an overcrowded boat across the Mediterranean, and when a storm hits, many of the passengers drown. After arriving in Italy, and waiting for months to be more