• Amal is a feisty teenager growing up in post-revolution Egypt while they’re both undergoing a tremendous change. Within a constant political turmoil, Amal searches for her place, identity, and sexuality in a patriarchal society. Amal, whose name literally translates to “hope”, is embarking on a 6-year compelling journey from childhood to adulthood. Along the way, she realizes her limited options as a woman living in an Arab police state.

  • Part film, part baptism, director Khalik Allah casts his lens between the prostitutes and churches of Jamaica; creating a visual prayer of indelible portraits and an intimate polyphonic symphony.

  • A beautiful actress struggles to connect with her disfigured co-star on the set of a European auteur’s English-language debut. Through pitch-black satire, Chained for Life examines the treatment of disability on screen and on set.

  • Lauren Greenfield’s postcard from the edge of the American Empire captures a portrait of a materialistic, image-obsessed culture. Simultaneously photographic journey, memoir, and historical essay, the film bears witness to the global boom–bust economy, the corrupted American Dream and the human costs of late-stage capitalism, narcissism and greed.

  • Composed of intimate and unencumbered moments of people in a community, this film is constructed in a form that allows the viewer an emotive impression of the Historic South – trumpeting the beauty of life and consequences of the social construction of race, while simultaneously a testament to dreaming.

  • MATANGI / MAYA / M.I.A. is drawn from a cache of personal tapes shot by Maya Arulpragasm and her closest friends over the last 22 years, capturing her remarkable journey from immigrant teenager in London, to the international popstar M.I.A. Inspired by her roots, M.I.A. created a mashup, cut-and-paste identity that pulled from every corner of her journey; a sonic sketchbook that blended Tamil politics, Art school punk, hip-hop beats and the voice of multicultural youth. Never compromising, Maya kept her camera rolling through her battles with the music industry more

  • When a young father witnesses the police shooting of an unarmed black man, the tight-knit community of Bed-Stuy is pushed to the brink in Reinaldo Marcus Green’s Sundance Award-winning portrait of race, family, and consequence.

  • Angel LaMere is released from juvenile detention on the eve of her 18th birthday. Haunted by her past, she embarks on a journey with her 10 year-old sister that could destroy their future.

  • Part time capsule, part folk song, Phantom Cowboys follows three teenage boys as they approach adulthood in vastly different parts of the United States. Moving fluidly between the deserts of California, the valleys of West Virginia, and the sugarcane fields of Florida, the film explores the lives of these young men during two formative periods—transitioning forward and backward in time over a span of eight years. Larry, Nick, and Ty navigate their teenage and early-adult years through a series of interconnected vignettes, candidly narrated in their own words. The film’s more

  • In 1992, teenager Sandi Tan shot Singapore’s first road movie with her enigmatic American mentor, Georges—who then absconded with all the footage. The 16mm film is recovered 20 years later, sending Tan, now a novelist in Los Angeles, on a personal odyssey in search of Georges’ vanishing footprints—and her own.

  • In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, black telemarketer Cassius Green discovers a magical key to professional success—which propels him into a macabre universe. Sorry to Bother You made its world premiere in the U.S. Dramatic Competition at Sundance 2018. It will be released in July 2018 by Annapurna.

  • Why is it that some countries seem to be continually mired in cyclical wars, political instability and economic crises? The Democratic Republic of the Congo is one such a place, a mineral-rich Central African country that, over the last two decades, has seen more than five million conflict-related deaths, multiple regime changes and the wholesale impoverishment of its people. Yet though this ongoing conflict is the world’s bloodiest since WWII, little is known in the West about the players or stakes involved. This is Congo provides an immersive and unfiltered more

  • Us three, us brothers, us kings. Manny, Joel and Jonah tear their way through childhood and push against the volatile love of their parents. As Manny and Joel grow into versions of their father and Ma dreams of escape, Jonah, the youngest, embraces an imagined world all his own. Based on the novel by Justin Torres. We the Animals premiered in the NEXT category at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival and received the NEXT Innovator Award.

  • Wild Nights With Emily is the story of the secret life of Emily Dickinson (played by Molly Shannon). The poet’s persona, popularized since her death, is that of a reclusive spinster—a delicate wallflower, too sensitive for this world. This film explores the vivacious, irreverent side of her that was covered up for many years and recently revealed— most notably Emily’s lifelong romance with another woman, Susan Dickinson, the wife of Emily’s brother. After Emily died, the mistress of Emily’s brother would publish Emily’s poems. A fierce rivalry between Emily’s beloved more